Let the databases help out with referencing

Swedish

Most student essays and theses require correct referencing, this means that you need to place references to your sources both in the text and in a bibliography or a reference list at the end of your document. The references are sorted in alphabetical order and should contain sufficient information for your readers to easily find the documents you have used in your work.

There are automatic functions available in various search engines to automatically extract citations for a bibliography. Here are some examples:

Primo – www.hb.se/library
The library’s new discovery tool. Here you will find references to our print book collection as well as lots of e-books and articles.

Libris – libris.kb.se
Sweden’s national library catalog. Here you can find books, dissertations, reports and more available at Swedish libraries.

Google Scholar – scholar.google.com 
Here you can do a broad search for scientific literature. You also can find student papers, theses, books, abstracts and articles, from universities and academic publishers here. Note, however, that everything in Google Scholar is not “scientific” but there are still different in content and functions other than the search engine Google.

Adjustments necessary
Please note that the  formatting and content can vary between different search engines – therefore, always make sure that all references in your source list has a consistent look and conforms to your preferred style.

Reference to a book:
Eklund, K. (2007). Our economy: An introduction to the national economy. 11. Edition, Stockholm: Norstedts..

Reference to a journal article:
Elmqvist, C., Brown, D., Fridlund, B., & Ekebergh, M. (2010). Being first on the scene of an accident – experiences of ‘doing’ prehospital emergency care. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, 24 (2), ss. 266-273.

Text: Sara Hellberg
Picture: Colourbox