Learn how to use Statista

The database Statista is an international statistics and market data platform.

Statista

Statista gives you access to lots of data

The database Statista is an international statistics and market data platform with access to more than 1.5 million statistics, forecasts, dossiers, reports and infographics on 80 000 topics from more than 18 000 sources. The platform combines economic data, consumer insights, opinion polls and demographic trends.

All data can be downloaded in four different office formats. Every student, lecturer and member of staff at the University receives full publication and usage rights of the data.

Guides and videos

Watch the video Statista Explainer (01:29) to get an overview and learn how to benefit from Statista.

On the Statista website you will find more guides and videos showing you how to use and benefit from Statista.

If you have any questions or concerns regarding Statista, please feel free to contact us at e-mail biblioteket@hb.se.

Text and image: Klaz Arvidson

Posted in Uncategorized

Published at the University of Borås in 2018

House of Knowledge
House of Knowledge

Every year researchers, teachers and other staff at the University of Borås publish a variety of publications, most of which presents research results or similar. The publications come in a range of different types; doctoral theses, licentiate theses, peer review articles, popular scientific articles, book chapters, books, reports, etc. All of these publications are to be registered in the university publication database DiVA. This means that if you are interested in what is published by the university – search DiVA to find out.

In 2018, 417 research publications were registered in DiVA (DiVA, 2019-02-05). The publications where divided into the following publication types:

Of all these publications, 298 were classified in the category Refereed and 85 in the category Other academic.

In order to access data for research publications published by the university in 2018, you can use the link below:

Text and image: Klaz Arvidson

Databases and e-resources with free access

The Library subscribes to a lot of databases and e-resource packages. To be able to use them you have to be a student or staff at the university. To complement the subscribed resources, we have also resources that does not require subscriptions in the database lists. These free resources can be of value for you after your studies at the university.

The free databases are linked on the webpage Databases – see Free databases a bit down on the page.

Here are some examples of databases that does not require subsciptions to be used.

Library catalouges

  • Primo, our own discovery system open for search, including some free material in full text
  • Libris, the national union library system for Sweden

Research

  • Diva (University of Borås) is a digital archive for research publications and student theses published by the University of Borås
  • SwePub makes it possible to search among articles, conference papers, dissertations etc. published at Swedish universities and authorities
  • DOAJ (Directory of Open Access Journals) indexes and provides access to high quality, open access, peer-reviewed journals

Reference databases

  • ERIC Database contains references to articles, books, reports, dissertations, conferences and more from the field of education
  • PubMed contains references to articles, reports, dissertations and more from general practice, clinical medicine, nursing care and health care

Law

  • Lagrummet.se links to legal information from the government, parliament, higher courts and public authorities
  • EUR-Lex gives access to the official journal, treaties, legislation, preparatory legal documents, legal usage, questions from the members of parliament and more

More free databases

There are many more useful databases in the list. Take a look in the “List of free databases” and see if you find someone that you think is valuable to you.

Text and image: Klaz Arvidson

Search Tips in Primo: copy, available, requests

When searching for books in Primo, you can see in the result list whether a book is on the shelf or is borrowed. If you click on a book, you can see more information about the book’s loan status and make a reservation if the book already is borrowed.

Is the book on the shelf or is it borrowed?

Primo’s result list consists of items that you have access to electronically, such as articles and e-books, as well as printed material that can be picked up from the library shelves. For the printed material, it’s possible to make a reservation if the book you are looking for  is borrowed. To make a reservation for a book, you have to login to Primo. In logged-in mode you will also see when a borrowed book is expected to be in again.

Below are a couple of examples of how you see the difference between books on the shelves and books that are borrowed directly in Primo’s result list.

A book on the shelf:

“Available at The Library …” means that the book is in place on the shelf and is possible to borrow.

A book that is borrowed:

“Checked out from The Library …” means that the book is borrowed but it’s possible to make a reservation on the book and pick it up when the book has been returned to The Library.

What does Copy, Available, Requests mean?

When you click on a book, you will see more information about the book as well as its loan status. There is of course information about which floor and shelf it is placed on and how many copies there are. Here we focus on the terms Copy, Available and Requests.

A book on the shelf:

In the case above, it appears that there is 1 copy of the book (1 copy) and that it’s available on the shelf (1 available). Further it appears that the Policy for the book is 21 Days Loan and that the Status is Item in place.

A book that is borrowed:

In this case it appears that there is 1 copy of the book (1 copy) and there is no available copy on the shelf (0 available). There is no request on the book (0 requests) so if you make a reservation, it’s your turn when the book is returned to the library. Further it appears that the Policy for the book is 21 Days loan and that the Status is On loan until a certain date. It’s after this date you get access to the book if you make a reservation on it. To reserve a borrowed book and to see the return date for it, you must be logged in to Primo.

Note that it’s not possible to make reservations on books that are on the shelves.

Text and images: Klaz Arvidson

Search Tips in Primo: delimit to Peer Reviewed

When you search in Primo you will be able to refine your searches in several ways in order to focus on the results. You will find the facets in the menu to the left of the interface.

Your search in Primo often results in a result list consisting of entries with several different resource types such as Book, Book Chapter, Journal Article, Newspaper Article, Dissertation and other resource types. These are delimited in the “Resource Type” facet.

In the “Show Only” facet there are further possibilities for delimiting the search against Peer Reviewed, Full Text, Available in the Library and Open Access. If you are searching for articles, especially scientific articles, you will benefit from using the Peer Reviewed delimitation. This delimitation provides entries in the result list that are published in primarily journals that have a procedure for reviewing and approving articles before they are published in the journal. In this way you get more focus on scientific articles. 

An example of a record in Primo with the Peer Reviewed stamp.

If you have any doubts about a particular journal, if it has a peer review process, you can use the Ulrichsweb database to check it. Keep in mind that all material in a scientific journal is not scientifically reviewed, such as leaders, reviews, comments, and more.

Text and images: Klaz Arvidson

Search Tips in Primo: delimit to books

When you search in Primo you will be able to refine your searches in several ways. You will find the facets in the menu to the left of the interface.

Let’s say you’re looking for a printed book. Once you have entered your search terms in the search box and made the search, you get a result list that can be quite extensive. In the result list you will probably find several different types of publications, such as Journal Articles, Books, Conference Proceedings, Dissertations and more. In order to focus on books, you have several delimitation options available.

Printed books

If you are looking for a printed book, you can select “The Library” under the heading “Library”. Then you will get a result list of titles found in the library’s collection of mainly printed material. If you only want to see the titles that are on shelf in this moment, not yet borrowed, you can click on “Available in the Library” under the heading “Show Only”. Remember, however, you do not see the full collection if you choose “Available in the Library”, so if you’re planning to reserve a book, it’s preferable
to delimit to “The Library”. Then you will see books that are both on the shelf and are borrowed in the result list.

Printed and electronic books

If you are looking for both printed and electronic books, you can select “Books” under the heading “Resource Type”. Then you get both printed and electronic books in the result list. If you are looking for books in a particular subject, this method may be preferable as you get more titles to choose from.

By using the facets in Primo you have the opportunity to refine your searches and specify the result list.

Text and images: Klaz Arvidson

Save and monitor your searches in Primo automatically

In the Primo discovery service you can search most of the library’s collections of printed and electronic material. Primo offers several possibilities for refining searches as well as saving and monitoring already made searches. The Primo search box can be found on the library homepage.

Save and monitor searches in Primo

You can save your searches in Primo and automatically let Primo monitor them for you.

How to do it:

  • Start by doing a search in Primo, refine it as you like
  • When you are satisfied with your search, save the search. To save a search you have to login in to your Primo account.
  • When you have logged in to Primo, click on the icon Search History
  • Under the Search History tab, select the search you want to save by clicking the Needle
  • Select the Saved Searches tab and click the Alarm bell to enable monitoring of the search

Now your search is saved and being monitored. When there is new material that matches your search, you will receive an email from Primo, telling you that there are additional records for the monitored search.

In Primo, it looks like this:

Do your search

1. Do your search.

Login to your account In Primo

2. Login to your Primo account.

Click the icon for Search History

3. Click the icon for Search History.

Save your search by clicking the Needle

4. Save your search by clicking the Needle.

Activate monitoring of your search by clicking the Alarm bell

5. Activate monitoring of your search by clicking the Alarm bell.

Text and images: Klaz Arvidson