Comfort Rules

Since the library is a workplace for many students and for us to have a pleasant
working environmentwe have some comfort rules that we hope everyone will follow.

When it comes to level of noises and if you get to talk in the Library or not, it is perfectly OK to talk and have discussions in the lounge, since we are not a silent library, but you should have a low noise level. If you want a little more heated discussions, we have group rooms that you can book and for those who want absolute silence when they study, we have quiet study room where you are not allowed to talk at all.

Although it is allowed to talk on cellphones in most places around the library, it is cellphone free zone in the area around the information point. It is good to think about the sound level when you talk on the phone when it is easy to talk loudly without you know it yourself.

When it comes to food and drink, you get to eat fruit, sweets and some sandwiches in the library. You should not eat messy sandwiches like tuna sandwiches or hot food but cheese and ham sandwiches is ok.

Taking a break from studying and going away to eat can be a good way to clear your thoughts, regain focus and get new energy. There is a lunch lounge just outside the library with microwave ovens, two fridges and a coffee machine. All students have access to the lounge.

You can have drinks with a lid on the library. You are not allowed to take in soft drinks or energy drinks into the library when it can be really messy if you would accidentally pour out a bit.

Text: Tandis Talay
Picture: Mostphotos

Google (or the database) is not the source!

Question from a student: I found this article in the database ERIC – how do I put that in the reference?

 

Questions about how to write references are common in the library Information Point. Sometimes there´s confusion about where to put the different commas, or the student might be clueless as to how to write a reference to an oral source, and sometimes students also ask how to include the search tool (i.e. the database of the search engine) they used when they found the source. In this last case, the answer is always: It shall not be included in the reference. Period.

When you write a reference in your work (thesis, paper, home exams) there will be several different reasons to why you use a certain reference. Sometimes you might want to show how well-read you are, sometimes you want to prove the argument you just made with someone else’s research, or maybe you include a reference to an article written by your teacher (just to show the teacher that you have read something by her). No matter why your chose to refer to a source, you must include the reference to that source in the reference list. Thus: If you refer to an article by Henderson, the reference to Henderson’s article should be listed in the reference list. And it doesn’t matter how you found the article; if it were a friend that sent you a link, if you found it on Google, or if you’ve searched systematically in one of the databases provided by the library.

The reason to include a reference list in your work is that everyone who reads your paper should be able to find your sources, if they need to. And the reader might not have access to the same databases that you do (or the same friends for that matter – if your received the source as a link from your friend). Consequently is it important that all information about the source – such as title, author, year, publisher and so on) is correct, since it makes it easier for the person who sets out to find the source you’ve been using. But the tool you’ve used is not relevant (i.e. the database, Google, or maybe your friend).

Remember: The database is the road to your source, but it’s not a part of the source!

Text: Katharina Nordling
Photo: Suss Wilén

Reservation for book in Primo – here’s how it works

If you have been searching for a book in Primo and it turns out to be on loan (and you don’t need the book the same day), you might want to make a reservation for the book. Now you can easily make reservations on your own in Primo; here is a brief description of how it works:

1. Search for the book in Primo on the Library web page. When you locate the book in the hit list – click on the book title.

2. Log in to the system with your UB-account.

3. Click the Request link. It will only be available if all copies of the book are on loan. If there are copies available in the Library, the link will not be there (because it is not possible to reserve books when there are copies available for loan).

4. Click the Request button. If you want, you can change the date for how long the request will be active (an opportunity if you know that if you don’t get the book before a certain date, you don’t need the book at all).

5. Once you’ve clicked Request you will get a notification that the request was activated. If you don’t get this notification – please contact the Information Point.

6. As soon as the book is available for you we will place it on the shelf for reserved books. It will be placed alphabetically by your last name.

7. Now you’ll receive an e-mail notifying you that the book is waiting for you at the library. The book will be on the shelf, waiting for you for three days, the last pickup date will be specified in the e-mail we sent you.

8. Once you found the book, you borrow it in the machines next to the entrance as usual.


Notice: You cannot make a request for a book that you’ve already borrowed, or a book that you already have an active request for. Or a request books that are available on shelf.

Text & picture: Katharina Nordling

Printing – here’s how you do it!

Do you need to print a document, but you’re not sure how to do it? Then this is what you need to read! This instruction explains how you print from the computers at the university. If you want to print a document from your laptop – please contact the Information Point at the entrance to the Library.

At the computer

The most important part when you’re about to print, is to select the right printer. And that’s not very hard – you should ALWAYS select the printer called Print-and-Collect.

How the printing dialog (the frame where you manage your prints) looks depends on which program you are printing from. Here are two examples, the print dialog in Microsoft Word and in Adobe Acrobat (program for pdf-files):

utskriftutskrift2Click on the pictures if you want to see them better!

 

Make sure that the right printer is selected, that’s Print-and-Collect– then you click at the button Print (in Swedish Skriv ut). Done!

At the printer

Okay, so far so good. The document has been printed. Now what? Where do you go to get it? The thing is that you can now go to any printer – at the whole university – at the printer you get your printed document. At the Library, we have printers on each floor (except floor 2.5). The printers are quite big, and looks like copying machines (in fact, they are coping machines as well as printers and scanners). When you found a printer, here’s what you do:

  1. Log in to the printer, using your black chip or your S-number and password.
  2. Select Release by pressing this “button” on the touch screen.
  3. Select the document you want to print by pointing at it at the touch screen. The document will be marked with a yellow line when you’ve selected it.
  4. Press the blue button (it’s a real button – not on the touch screen).
  5. Voila! You document is printed!

If your document won’t print, it might depend on that you don’t have enough printing credentials left on your printing account. Contact the Information Point for directions on how to refill your printing account. When you have done that, you just return to the printer, and get you document (no need to print from the computer again).

If you print a large document on many pages (such as an essay) or a Powerpoint with images, it may take a while for the document to print.

If you have any questions – please contact the Information Point by the entrance to the Library. We can help you to print!

Text & pictures: Katharina Nordling

Books to read if you’re writing your student thesis

It’s spring term and high season for thesis writing, which can be both scary, hard, interesting, and fun at once – here you will find tips on books that can help you in the process of writing your thesis. They cover the topics research methods and academic writing.

As for the method, this is a central part of the process: What method do you use in your studies, and how do you describe this in the thesis? Here is where the method books come in as a savior. Some of you have had method courses earlier; others will have a method course just before the thesis writing starts. And you will, of course, get some tips on good in these courses, but there are other books than the course literature, and you’ll find plenty of books at the library. The largest part of all books on quantitative and qualitative methods can be found at department 300 on level 2.5 in the library.

There are also some good books to read on writing in general, and on academic writing in particular. These books will give you tips and advice when it comes to language (for example how to write in a passive voice instead of in first person), how to formulate different parts of the thesis (how to write the introduction), etcetera. You will find most of these books on shelf 808.066 on floor 4 in the library.

Text & photo: Katharina Nordling

My Library

Do you wonder where you can see which books you have borrowed and when your last return date is? Or do you want to see if you have any late fees or do you want to know which books have reserverd?

On the Libraries webpage you have a quick link called my library. Here you have all the information about your loans collected. If you are a student or an employee here at the University of Borås, select Users at the University and log in with your regular user account.

Once you’re logged in, you have an overview image. Here you can see directly your loans and orders of books, as well as a summary of your possible late fees.

Under The Loans tab you can see all your loans. If you wonder why you don’t find a renew button here, is because we have automatic loans.  So you don’t have to worry about your loans for as long as no one has reserved the book, it will be automatically renewed up to 4 months. If the book you have borrowed is a interlibrary loan, and you want to renew it, you must contact ill@hb.se to renew the loan.

Course books have a 7-day loan period and all other books have a 21-day loan period. We have a late charge of 10kr per day per book. You will receive reminders via email when a book has to be returned, therefore it is important that you know which email is registered on you. This is shown in the overview image under the Personal Information tab.

Here you can read more about our loan rules.

Text: Tandis Talay
Picture: Katharina Nordling

 

Welcome to a new semester!

Welcome all of you new and old students and researchers!

It’s time for a new semester and today is the first day, and for many of you this a familiar environment you come back to – but for some of you the University of Borås is a whole new experience. Maybe new accommodation, new city, new student buddies and new courses. Here on the Library blog we want to give you a few tips that can help you, new or old student, regarding library services:

  • Library opening hours are displayed on the website.
  • A reference copy of all required textbooks are available on the 1st floor – these books can not be borrowed and are only for use in the library.
  • All textbooks for loan stands on each subjectshelf in the library. Many textbooks are also available as e-books.
  • Most of our materials can be found by searching in Primo (our discovery tool). You find the searchbox on our website.
  • Your tag is your library card and also a copy / print card.
  • Photocopying is mainly available the 1st floor.
  • Multifunction printers are available on all floors (except 2.5). Instructions for printing can be found here.
  • The library has many study rooms – you book the rooms through Kronox.
  • All books in the library are in numerical order – from 000 on level 2.5 to 999 on the 4th floor.
  • The library has printed journals on level 1 but also on level 2. But the majority of our journals are electronic, and you can find them through the website.
  • Adjust the sound level to a normal conversational tone, this is a place of work for many people. A good idea is to put your phone in silent mode.
  • There is a quiet study room in the library, you find it at the entrance floor.
  • Keep in mind that you’re not allowed to eat in the library. Drinks with lids, fruit and candy are OK; but for eating – please visit the café or the lounge with microwave ovens outside the library.
  • If you need help with information seeking just come ask the librarian at the Information point, we will gladly help you.
  • The Library Search lab has drop-in hours if you need further help with your information seeking. In addition, the Language lab is open at the same time in the same room, so you can also get help with linguistic questions.
  • If you have questions about your user account, problems with Microsoft Word or other questions, please feel free to contact us.

If you are a new student – please read more on our website with helpful information for you as a new student. P.S. Feel free to follow us in social media!

Text: Lena Holmberg
Photo: Suss Wilén