Search Tips in Primo: copy, available, requests

When searching for books in Primo, you can see in the result list whether a book is on the shelf or is borrowed. If you click on a book, you can see more information about the book’s loan status and make a reservation if the book already is borrowed.

Is the book on the shelf or is it borrowed?

Primo’s result list consists of items that you have access to electronically, such as articles and e-books, as well as printed material that can be picked up from the library shelves. For the printed material, it’s possible to make a reservation if the book you are looking for  is borrowed. To make a reservation for a book, you have to login to Primo. In logged-in mode you will also see when a borrowed book is expected to be in again.

Below are a couple of examples of how you see the difference between books on the shelves and books that are borrowed directly in Primo’s result list.

A book on the shelf:

“Available at The Library …” means that the book is in place on the shelf and is possible to borrow.

A book that is borrowed:

“Checked out from The Library …” means that the book is borrowed but it’s possible to make a reservation on the book and pick it up when the book has been returned to The Library.

What does Copy, Available, Requests mean?

When you click on a book, you will see more information about the book as well as its loan status. There is of course information about which floor and shelf it is placed on and how many copies there are. Here we focus on the terms Copy, Available and Requests.

A book on the shelf:

In the case above, it appears that there is 1 copy of the book (1 copy) and that it’s available on the shelf (1 available). Further it appears that the Policy for the book is 21 Days Loan and that the Status is Item in place.

A book that is borrowed:

In this case it appears that there is 1 copy of the book (1 copy) and there is no available copy on the shelf (0 available). There is no request on the book (0 requests) so if you make a reservation, it’s your turn when the book is returned to the library. Further it appears that the Policy for the book is 21 Days loan and that the Status is On loan until a certain date. It’s after this date you get access to the book if you make a reservation on it. To reserve a borrowed book and to see the return date for it, you must be logged in to Primo.

Note that it’s not possible to make reservations on books that are on the shelves.

Text and images: Klaz Arvidson

Search Tips in Primo: delimit to Peer Reviewed

When you search in Primo you will be able to refine your searches in several ways in order to focus on the results. You will find the facets in the menu to the left of the interface.

Your search in Primo often results in a result list consisting of entries with several different resource types such as Book, Book Chapter, Journal Article, Newspaper Article, Dissertation and other resource types. These are delimited in the “Resource Type” facet.

In the “Show Only” facet there are further possibilities for delimiting the search against Peer Reviewed, Full Text, Available in the Library and Open Access. If you are searching for articles, especially scientific articles, you will benefit from using the Peer Reviewed delimitation. This delimitation provides entries in the result list that are published in primarily journals that have a procedure for reviewing and approving articles before they are published in the journal. In this way you get more focus on scientific articles. 

An example of a record in Primo with the Peer Reviewed stamp.

If you have any doubts about a particular journal, if it has a peer review process, you can use the Ulrichsweb database to check it. Keep in mind that all material in a scientific journal is not scientifically reviewed, such as leaders, reviews, comments, and more.

Text and images: Klaz Arvidson

Search Tips in Primo: delimit to books

When you search in Primo you will be able to refine your searches in several ways. You will find the facets in the menu to the left of the interface.

Let’s say you’re looking for a printed book. Once you have entered your search terms in the search box and made the search, you get a result list that can be quite extensive. In the result list you will probably find several different types of publications, such as Journal Articles, Books, Conference Proceedings, Dissertations and more. In order to focus on books, you have several delimitation options available.

Printed books

If you are looking for a printed book, you can select “The Library” under the heading “Library”. Then you will get a result list of titles found in the library’s collection of mainly printed material. If you only want to see the titles that are on shelf in this moment, not yet borrowed, you can click on “Available in the Library” under the heading “Show Only”. Remember, however, you do not see the full collection if you choose “Available in the Library”, so if you’re planning to reserve a book, it’s preferable
to delimit to “The Library”. Then you will see books that are both on the shelf and are borrowed in the result list.

Printed and electronic books

If you are looking for both printed and electronic books, you can select “Books” under the heading “Resource Type”. Then you get both printed and electronic books in the result list. If you are looking for books in a particular subject, this method may be preferable as you get more titles to choose from.

By using the facets in Primo you have the opportunity to refine your searches and specify the result list.

Text and images: Klaz Arvidson

Welcome to our Language & Search Lab!

Did you know that you can get help with your difficult searches, reference questions or help with the difficult academic language? Every Thursday between 12 pm and 15 pm there is a language teacher and one or two librarians who usually work with information search in room J441.

Long time ago we had a language lab and a search lab in the library, but since many questions slip into each other, it felt practical and beneficial to be able to help with both search and reference questions while at the same having a language pedagogical supervision. So in 2016, we merged the language and the search lab and have it once a week. On Mondays and Wednesdays, it’s only the language lab in room J441.

You do not need to book in advance. It is Drop-In. Many students visit Language and search Lab time to time and sometimes we have many students at the same time, witch means that you may have to wait for help. You can log in to a computer in the room and work while you are waiting.

Text: Lena Wadell

Foto:  Dmitry Ratushny,  Unsplash

Teaching information seaching

Teachers, now it’s time to book information searching for your students for the next semester. If you know that it is (or should) be a part of the course you are responsible or involved in, then please contact one of our teaching libraries. We have already booked a lot of teaching and it is getting crowded in our schedules.

We who work as teaching librarians are from the left: Lena Wadell, responsible for the business and economic programs and Informatics. Sara Hellberg is in charge of the Care and Health  programs. Karin Süld handles textile programs like fashion design and textile technology. Birgitta Rutberg is in charge of Engineering such as building, resource recovery, chemistry and industrial economics and the library and information science. Åsa Brolund is new here at the Library and is responsible for all teacher programs.

Photo: Klaz Arvidsson
Text: Lena Wadell

Save and monitor your searches in Primo automatically

In the Primo discovery service you can search most of the library’s collections of printed and electronic material. Primo offers several possibilities for refining searches as well as saving and monitoring already made searches. The Primo search box can be found on the library homepage.

Save and monitor searches in Primo

You can save your searches in Primo and automatically let Primo monitor them for you.

How to do it:

  • Start by doing a search in Primo, refine it as you like
  • When you are satisfied with your search, save the search. To save a search you have to login in to your Primo account.
  • When you have logged in to Primo, click on the icon Search History
  • Under the Search History tab, select the search you want to save by clicking the Needle
  • Select the Saved Searches tab and click the Alarm bell to enable monitoring of the search

Now your search is saved and being monitored. When there is new material that matches your search, you will receive an email from Primo, telling you that there are additional records for the monitored search.

In Primo, it looks like this:

Do your search

1. Do your search.

Login to your account In Primo

2. Login to your Primo account.

Click the icon for Search History

3. Click the icon for Search History.

Save your search by clicking the Needle

4. Save your search by clicking the Needle.

Activate monitoring of your search by clicking the Alarm bell

5. Activate monitoring of your search by clicking the Alarm bell.

Text and images: Klaz Arvidson

Search articles from a specific journal in Primo

In the Primo discovery service you can search most of the library’s collections of printed and electronic material. Primo offers several possibilities for refining searches. The Primo search box can be found on the library homepage.

Search articles in a particular journal

In Primo it is possible to use the facets to narrow down a search for a specific journal and search for articles published in the selected journal.

How to do it:

  • Start by searching the journal title
  • In the Facet menu, select the journal in the Journal title facet
  • After that, lock the refinement to the selected journal in the Active Filter facet by clicking on the padlock
  • Then you can enter the terms you wish to search in the search box

In Primo, it looks like this:

1. Search for the journal by typing in its title.

2. In the facet Journal Title you refine to the selected journal. 3. In the facet Active filters, you lock the refinement to the selected journal by clicking the padlock.

4. In the search box, type your search terms and click the search button.

Text and images: Klaz Arvidson