Teaching information seaching

Teachers, now it’s time to book information searching for your students for the next semester. If you know that it is (or should) be a part of the course you are responsible or involved in, then please contact one of our teaching libraries. We have already booked a lot of teaching and it is getting crowded in our schedules.

We who work as teaching librarians are from the left: Lena Wadell, responsible for the business and economic programs and Informatics. Sara Hellberg is in charge of the Care and Health  programs. Karin Süld handles textile programs like fashion design and textile technology. Birgitta Rutberg is in charge of Engineering such as building, resource recovery, chemistry and industrial economics and the library and information science. Åsa Brolund is new here at the Library and is responsible for all teacher programs.

Photo: Klaz Arvidsson
Text: Lena Wadell

Save and monitor your searches in Primo automatically

In the Primo discovery service you can search most of the library’s collections of printed and electronic material. Primo offers several possibilities for refining searches as well as saving and monitoring already made searches. The Primo search box can be found on the library homepage.

Save and monitor searches in Primo

You can save your searches in Primo and automatically let Primo monitor them for you.

How to do it:

  • Start by doing a search in Primo, refine it as you like
  • When you are satisfied with your search, save the search. To save a search you have to login in to your Primo account.
  • When you have logged in to Primo, click on the icon Search History
  • Under the Search History tab, select the search you want to save by clicking the Needle
  • Select the Saved Searches tab and click the Alarm bell to enable monitoring of the search

Now your search is saved and being monitored. When there is new material that matches your search, you will receive an email from Primo, telling you that there are additional records for the monitored search.

In Primo, it looks like this:

Do your search

1. Do your search.

Login to your account In Primo

2. Login to your Primo account.

Click the icon for Search History

3. Click the icon for Search History.

Save your search by clicking the Needle

4. Save your search by clicking the Needle.

Activate monitoring of your search by clicking the Alarm bell

5. Activate monitoring of your search by clicking the Alarm bell.

Text and images: Klaz Arvidson

Search articles from a specific journal in Primo

In the Primo discovery service you can search most of the library’s collections of printed and electronic material. Primo offers several possibilities for refining searches. The Primo search box can be found on the library homepage.

Search articles in a particular journal

In Primo it is possible to use the facets to narrow down a search for a specific journal and search for articles published in the selected journal.

How to do it:

  • Start by searching the journal title
  • In the Facet menu, select the journal in the Journal title facet
  • After that, lock the refinement to the selected journal in the Active Filter facet by clicking on the padlock
  • Then you can enter the terms you wish to search in the search box

In Primo, it looks like this:

1. Search for the journal by typing in its title.

2. In the facet Journal Title you refine to the selected journal. 3. In the facet Active filters, you lock the refinement to the selected journal by clicking the padlock.

4. In the search box, type your search terms and click the search button.

Text and images: Klaz Arvidson

Get to know Scopus

Scopus is a citation database from Elsevier that indexes articles from over 22 000 scientific journals and contains more than 69 million records. Across all research fields:

  • Mathematics
  • Engineering
  • Technology
  • Social sciences
  • Arts and humanities
  • Health and medicine

Scopus content also patents, books and conference proceedings.

How can I use Scopus?

As usual, you access specific databases from the Library webbsite for databases at www.hb.se/biblioteket. There are introductory films that will help you get started using the various features quickly:

The focus is on scientific publications such as journal articles and conference paper. A specialty is the ability to follow how the publications are used through citations and reference lists. In the database you also have the opportunity to compare how different journals rank against each other.

The occurrence of nouns varies greatly. The database does not have its own subject list / thesaurus, but reports topics from the different databases from which the items originate. An article may have nouns from different databases.

Scopus also has very good features if you want to analyze its search results. It’s also great to search only in the references when searching. Then you put it in search, so you can search for those who have referred to a certain book that are not in the database but can still be found in the references.

The database has a search history, which is good because you can then combine your searches in different ways without rewriting the search terms. The search history is saved from the login time. You can of course log in to the database and save searches, hits lists, etc.

Text: Lena Wadell

Information seaching on the schedule

Do you know what some librarians do in the library besides being available in the information points? If you are studying a program, there is always a schedule where there is information search in the library or Information Literacy. Many of the students who have been to the workshops have gained one and another Eye-opener

In the library we are these five librarians who educate students in information literacy. From the left: Birgitta Karin Sara Christel and Lena.

We plan the occasions together with the teachers for all program students, and the education takes place in three stages. We often have both lecture and workshop so the “tools” to seek their information can be used directly. What is meant by information literacy or information searching? Well, it’s all about finding out right in the library, searching efficiently online, and in databases, how to see different types of articles for source criticism and reference writing.

Among the students who came at the scheduled times, responding to our evaluations, we have received the comments:

“Very good with both theory and practice, many useful search terms and methods for finding information faster and more efficiently”

“Nice to know where to look !! “Now I can search much better”

“Awesome! got many useful tips! and great work afterwards “Looking for more ways and getting better on searching” “superfun!”

“Did me motivate to start searching for articles!”

“Very good and useful information, clearly presented!”

“The exercise was relevant and the questions made me reflect and want me to develop”.

“Relevant databases, I learned how to find topics”

“Reference writing is top notch! Can save a lot of time. Then it is absolutely important to define and combine keywords to help you find what you’re looking for ”

“How to use the subject headings! I did not have a clue before! ”

Here you can read another blog post about the information literacy education:

http://biblioteksbloggen.hb.se/2016/10/19/information-search-more-important-than-you-think/?lang=en

Text & Picure: Lena Wadell

Searching for articles in Primo – here’s how it works!

To search Primo is very much like searching our previous discovery system Summon, although there are some differences – in this blog post we will give you some guidance on how to use Primo to find articles! Use the search box at the Library start page as usual.

  • To locate a known article, just enter the title of the article and click the search button.
  • To find articles on a specific subject, enter your initial search terms and click the search button.

  • All articles in the results shall be available through the Library’s journal subscriptions. Click the ”Full text available” link to get to the article.

  • If you are looking for research articles you can start by applying the following settings:

  • Use the filters menu on the left side to further narrow down your search. You can easily remove filters one by one by clicking the x or remove all settings with “Reset filters”. You can narrow by language, year of publication, peer reviewed materials and more.

  • A new feature in Primo is the possibility to save your searches for future use. If you are not already logged in, start by clicking “Sign in” and then “Save query” in the menu bar:

  • Click the Pin icon to save interesting articles to a favorites list on your Primo account. Selected articles will be marked with a yellow colour in the results list.

  • Access your saved search queries and saved articles (My Favorites) by clicking the:

  • To get back to your search click the:
  • Click the three dots icon in the results list to access an options menu where you can create citations, links and send the link by e-mail to yourself or to someone else.

Please don’t hesitate to contact us if you have any questions about how to use Primo!

Text: Sara Hellberg

Searching for books in Primo – here’s how it works!

To search in Primo is very much alike searching in our previous discovery system Summon, although there are some differences – in this blog post we will give you some guidance on how to use Primo to find books! Use the search box at the Library start page as usual.

  • Search with quotes to find an exact title “Business research methods” or truncate by changing the ending of a word to * when you want to find all variations of a specific word. For example method* (= method, methods, methodology, methodologys etc.).

  • A search will give you books, articles and other kinds of material, you can limit your results to only books by using the facet Resource Type.

  • Primo groups different editions and versions of the same book, click on the title to see all the editions and chose which one you want.

If there’s only one printed version and one electronic version, they are shown like this:

  • If you click an e-book you will be transferred to a page where you can read and/or download the book.
  • If you click on a printed book you will see how many copies we have of the book, on which shelf you can find it, if it’s available (or on loan). If it’s on loan, you will be able to make a request of the book. (Nota Bene! – at the moment you need to contact biblioteket@hb.se to request books! We are working to solve the issue and make it possible to reserve books in Primo.)

  • If you want Primo to limit your results to printed books in the Library – click The Library.
  • If you want Primo to limit your results to printed books that’s not on loan at the moment – click Available in the Library.

By clicking the pin you can save the book to a favourite list in your account, smart if you want to keep the information about the book for later. Click the large pin icon in the pink upper menu bar to get to your Favourites list and see your saved titles.

In the menu that appears when you click the three dots next to each title in your search result you can create references and more.

Please don’t hesitate to contact us if you have any questions about how to use Primo!

Text: Sara Hellberg