Information seaching on the schedule

Do you know what some librarians do in the library besides being available in the information points? If you are studying a program, there is always a schedule where there is information search in the library or Information Literacy. Many of the students who have been to the workshops have gained one and another Eye-opener

In the library we are these five librarians who educate students in information literacy. From the left: Birgitta Karin Sara Christel and Lena.

We plan the occasions together with the teachers for all program students, and the education takes place in three stages. We often have both lecture and workshop so the “tools” to seek their information can be used directly. What is meant by information literacy or information searching? Well, it’s all about finding out right in the library, searching efficiently online, and in databases, how to see different types of articles for source criticism and reference writing.

Among the students who came at the scheduled times, responding to our evaluations, we have received the comments:

“Very good with both theory and practice, many useful search terms and methods for finding information faster and more efficiently”

“Nice to know where to look !! “Now I can search much better”

“Awesome! got many useful tips! and great work afterwards “Looking for more ways and getting better on searching” “superfun!”

“Did me motivate to start searching for articles!”

“Very good and useful information, clearly presented!”

“The exercise was relevant and the questions made me reflect and want me to develop”.

“Relevant databases, I learned how to find topics”

“Reference writing is top notch! Can save a lot of time. Then it is absolutely important to define and combine keywords to help you find what you’re looking for ”

“How to use the subject headings! I did not have a clue before! ”

Here you can read another blog post about the information literacy education:

http://biblioteksbloggen.hb.se/2016/10/19/information-search-more-important-than-you-think/?lang=en

Text & Picure: Lena Wadell

Searching for articles in Primo – here’s how it works!

To search Primo is very much like searching our previous discovery system Summon, although there are some differences – in this blog post we will give you some guidance on how to use Primo to find articles! Use the search box at the Library start page as usual.

  • To locate a known article, just enter the title of the article and click the search button.
  • To find articles on a specific subject, enter your initial search terms and click the search button.

  • All articles in the results shall be available through the Library’s journal subscriptions. Click the ”Full text available” link to get to the article.

  • If you are looking for research articles you can start by applying the following settings:

  • Use the filters menu on the left side to further narrow down your search. You can easily remove filters one by one by clicking the x or remove all settings with “Reset filters”. You can narrow by language, year of publication, peer reviewed materials and more.

  • A new feature in Primo is the possibility to save your searches for future use. If you are not already logged in, start by clicking “Sign in” and then “Save query” in the menu bar:

  • Click the Pin icon to save interesting articles to a favorites list on your Primo account. Selected articles will be marked with a yellow colour in the results list.

  • Access your saved search queries and saved articles (My Favorites) by clicking the:

  • To get back to your search click the:
  • Click the three dots icon in the results list to access an options menu where you can create citations, links and send the link by e-mail to yourself or to someone else.

Please don’t hesitate to contact us if you have any questions about how to use Primo!

Text: Sara Hellberg

Searching for books in Primo – here’s how it works!

To search in Primo is very much alike searching in our previous discovery system Summon, although there are some differences – in this blog post we will give you some guidance on how to use Primo to find books! Use the search box at the Library start page as usual.

  • Search with quotes to find an exact title “Business research methods” or truncate by changing the ending of a word to * when you want to find all variations of a specific word. For example method* (= method, methods, methodology, methodologys etc.).

  • A search will give you books, articles and other kinds of material, you can limit your results to only books by using the facet Resource Type.

  • Primo groups different editions and versions of the same book, click on the title to see all the editions and chose which one you want.

If there’s only one printed version and one electronic version, they are shown like this:

  • If you click an e-book you will be transferred to a page where you can read and/or download the book.
  • If you click on a printed book you will see how many copies we have of the book, on which shelf you can find it, if it’s available (or on loan). If it’s on loan, you will be able to make a request of the book. (Nota Bene! – at the moment you need to contact biblioteket@hb.se to request books! We are working to solve the issue and make it possible to reserve books in Primo.)

  • If you want Primo to limit your results to printed books in the Library – click The Library.
  • If you want Primo to limit your results to printed books that’s not on loan at the moment – click Available in the Library.

By clicking the pin you can save the book to a favourite list in your account, smart if you want to keep the information about the book for later. Click the large pin icon in the pink upper menu bar to get to your Favourites list and see your saved titles.

In the menu that appears when you click the three dots next to each title in your search result you can create references and more.

Please don’t hesitate to contact us if you have any questions about how to use Primo!

Text: Sara Hellberg

Is it time for your student thesis? Use the Library!

We are almost halfway through the spring semester and for some of our students the final sprint approaches – the student thesis needs to be written – here are some tips on how the library can help you when you’re writing your thesis.

One thing that is common for all students who write their thesis is that they need information to base the thesis on. It may be scientific articles, books on theoretical background or on methods used by students. No matter what kind of information you are looking for, it’s important to realize that the information is the foundation for your thesis. And it’s also important to realize that information seeking is often a very time consuming task, filled of setbacks. But if you make sure to structure your search for information it will all be a lot easier.

But do not despair! The librarians at the Library are experts in structuring information searches, and they are more than happy to help. Please, come to the Library and make sure to get a solid foundation to build your essay on.

There are two options if you want help of a librarian in your information search: You can come to our Search Lab – it is open every Thursday between 12:00-15:00. The Search Lab is staffed by one or two librarians who can help you to structure your searches. During this time the Language Lab is open as well. This means that you can ask language questions, or get tips on how to write your academic text at the same time.

Another option for help in your search for information is to come and get Search Support. Please come to the Information Point at the Library entrance, and the librarians manning the Information Point will help you with your searches.

Remember:  Use the Library, and the librarians, to get yourself a good foundation to build your essay on!

We also want to inform you that there are several posts in this blog full of great tips and advice for students writing their thesis. Here are some of them:

Text: Katharina Nordling
Photos: Colourbox

Is it time to think about you final student thesis?

Is it time to think about which topic you want to write about in you final thesis? Then it’s also good to start thinking about how to find information to your thesis, and of course, about your research questions. Keep reading this blog post and you will get information about how you can approach these things.

The point of the research question is to develop meaningful and relevant results. The idea is to formulate questions which will give you meaningful and relevant results and also to describe your work in a consist manner. Research questions can be descriptive (what is happening, what exists), relational (relationship between two or more variables) or causal (whether one or more variables causes one or more outcome variables).

How do you search for information effectively?
You can always start with Summon, which is the library search service. Here you can find anything from books and articles to e-books etc.

You can also search directly in a subject database. Here you can make specific searches that are focused to your particular subject and you also have more detailed search options.

You can access all of the library´s electronic resources from home – just log in with your username and password (the same as you use in PING PONG).

Libris (the Swedish Library catalogue) can be relevant for your search. Maybe other libraries have good books about your topic, in that case you can make an interlibrary loan which means that we will request the book/article for you. Interlibrary loans of books are free of charge but articles costs 40 SEK (80 SEK if we have to order outside Scandinavia).

Do you want to know more about student thesis writing and information seeking?

  • Call the Library at 033-435 40 50
  • E-mail the Library at biblioteket@hb.se
  • Come and get help at the information desk
  • Visit the Search Lab in J441 every Thursday at 12:00-15:00 and get help from a librarian.

Text: Tandis Talay
Picture: Colourbox

Teaching Information Literacy at the Library

1At the library we are five librarians involved in teaching students information literacy skills. It is Christel (as you see in the picture), she is responsible mainly for the students who are studying Education,  Birgitta for the Librarianship, Information  and Engineering, Sara for Web Editors, the Caring Science and Social Wellfare, Karin for Textiles and Fashion and Lena is responsible for the students who are studying Business, Informatics and Work Life.

Since 2009, the teaching is planned according to a model in which we librarians are planning together with the programme managers and course coordinators at the faculties. It aims to support students in developing information literacy skills. To achieve the best results the education has to be integrated into regular courses. It is important that there is a study assignment in the course that can be linked to information seeking.  The teaching will never be the same, but vary by student subjects and skills. It it free of charges for the faculties.

Optimally, we teach information seeking tree times during the student’s study time here.  It is  very clear that those who take the opportunity to come, often discover that it is not the same to seek scientific information and what they need for their studies as searching or googling the information they need in their everyday lives. The cooperation Library-Faculty is also important for us to get information about the size of the groups and previous knowledge, etc.

We have progression in our teaching so the first time the student comes to us, she or he learn to  search, evaluate  information generally in some common resources such as the library catalog Summon.  The second level provides a deeper knowledge  in the scientific information retrieval process. We introduce different search strategies. In the third  level, we demonstrate systematic information retrieval in relevant databases, eg thesaurus construction and to use search history and citation indexes. Although reference management software as EndNote usually included here. The last step will be helpful before and during the whole thesis.

The students study assignment for these educations are  often to search, evaluate and use scientific information on a given topic. Therefore, we almost always teach in form of a workshop. The students need to sit down and try to do different searches on their own. They have the librarian to consult.  At the library, we have  our own classroom ( J438) with computers. We think it is good that the students come to us at the library so they get used to come here.

Contacts for teaching

Text and photo: Lena Wadell

Source criticism and plagiarism

You might be in the midst of searching for scientific articles for your thesis or assignment. Do not forget to think critically when you do this work!

COLOURBOX1947363Source criticism is a method to examine the information and facts contained in the sources you choose to use. You value the sources and choose carefully what you want to include. Do not forget to use source criticism on other than text. For example pictures and video that nowdays are equally important to source view given how much you can edit and process them. Remember to differentiate between a primary source and secondary source. The Academy is considered primary sources (first-hand) to be more reliable. You can use following questions, irrespective of the material:

  • Who is the author of your source?
  • For what purpose is it published?
  • Is the research still relevant?
  • Where have the research been published? Has it been reviewed? ( peer-review)
  • Can other check the results?
  • What information do you get from other sources at the same event?
  • If others have done similar studies, which results have they reached?
  • Does the timing in movies and audio clips add up?
  • Who funded the research?
  • Does the results seem trustworthy? Are there other sources that are trustworthy to say the same thing?
  • Are the conclusions reasonable based on the theory and methodology used?

Take a look at the web page Källlkritik on the Internet which is a guide that .SE stands behind and which shows how you can review content on web pages.

It can be helpful to know what obligations you as the author of your essay or thesis have regarding plagiarism. On the University web you can find a great anti-plagiarism guide where most aspects of this matter are included. It is available through Ping Pong, but also open on the web from this page (click on the link in the text far down on the page).
And please see the movie where our former librarian Eli Bytoft-Nyaas is talking about the subject and deal critically  with sources and references. The anti-plagiarism tutorial included Urkund, a plagiarism handbook that inlcudes a list to look at if you want to know what actually is plagiarism when writing.

Text: Lena Holmberg
Bild. Colourbox