Ingmar Bergman 100 years!

2018 is the year when Ingmar Bergman would have celebrated his 100 years birthday and it is honored in many parts of the country. He is considered Sweden’s biggest filmmaker and has inspired and touched many film lovers worldwide. Bergman’s films are almost exclusively set in Sweden and also specially on the island of Fårö north of Gotland. He produced around sixty films, over one hundred and seventy theater sets and wrote about hundreds of books and articles. Some of his most famous works are the films The Seventh Seal, Wild strawberries, Persona and the autobiography Laterna Magica.

 

Although it is within the film that Ingmar Bergman is most famous, he worked a lot within the theater where he put up several of the most famous writers and dramatics of literature, such as, for example, Strindberg, Ibsen, Shakespeare and Goethe.

For his last years, he lived at Fårö, quite isolated from the outside world, but this year it is time to put Bergman back in the spotlight.

In our showcases at the library entrance we have collected books on and off Bergman so make sure to borrow his autobiography or perhaps a drama like The best intentions or Fanny and Alexander!

Text and collage: Lena Holmberg
Photo: Bengt Wanselius (http://www.ingmarbergman.se)

The book donation by Larsh Eriksson in place

Last year, the library received a donation of a large collection of books in areas such as textiles, fashion and management. The gift came from Larsh Eriksson, teacher of design management at The Swedish School of Textiles for many years. Larsh had a special interest in collecting books on the subject and wanted to donate his collection to the library. After a review at the home of Larsh, about 50 moving boxes came with books to the library and were unpacked in the following year.

Everything has been reviewed and most of the books have been cataloged and moved into the library collections. The last books where placed on shelves by the end of 2017.

The books are now available for lending and may be of great interest for students at The Swedish School of Textiles, but also for other persons. There are many beautiful books in art, fashion, design, decor that can attract everyone. All books are now part of the library’s collection and are searchable in Primo. If you want to know more, please contact Martin Borg here at the library, or else – welcome here to borrow! 

Read more about Larsh Eriksson and the book collection at the university website and in Borås Tidning.

Text & image: Lena Holmberg

Welcome to a new semester!

Welcome all of you new and old students and researchers!

It’s time for a new semester and today is the first day, and for many of you this a familiar environment you come back to – but for some of you the University of Borås is a whole new experience. Maybe new accommodation, new city, new student buddies and new courses. Here on the Library blog we want to give you a few tips that can help you, new or old student, regarding library services:

  • Library opening hours are displayed on the website.
  • A reference copy of all required textbooks are available on the 1st floor – these books can not be borrowed and are only for use in the library.
  • All textbooks for loan stands on each subjectshelf in the library. Many textbooks are also available as e-books.
  • Most of our materials can be found by searching in Primo (our discovery tool). You find the searchbox on our website.
  • Your tag is your library card and also a copy / print card.
  • Photocopying is mainly available the 1st floor.
  • Multifunction printers are available on all floors (except 2.5). Instructions for printing can be found here.
  • The library has many study rooms – you book the rooms through Kronox.
  • All books in the library are in numerical order – from 000 on level 2.5 to 999 on the 4th floor.
  • The library has printed journals on level 1 but also on level 2. But the majority of our journals are electronic, and you can find them through the website.
  • Adjust the sound level to a normal conversational tone, this is a place of work for many people. A good idea is to put your phone in silent mode.
  • There is a quiet study room in the library, you find it at the entrance floor.
  • Keep in mind that you’re not allowed to eat in the library. Drinks with lids, fruit and candy are OK; but for eating – please visit the café or the lounge with microwave ovens outside the library.
  • If you need help with information seeking just come ask the librarian at the Information point, we will gladly help you.
  • The Library Search lab has drop-in hours if you need further help with your information seeking. In addition, the Language lab is open at the same time in the same room, so you can also get help with linguistic questions.
  • If you have questions about your user account, problems with Microsoft Word or other questions, please feel free to contact us.

If you are a new student – please read more on our website with helpful information for you as a new student. P.S. Feel free to follow us in social media!

Text: Lena Holmberg
Photo: Suss Wilén

The Library Breakfast offered talk about filter bubbles and source criticism

Yesterday, there was a Library Breakfast at the library again, this time with the subject of filter bubbles and source criticism. Sara Hellberg and Pieta Eklund briefly explained where the concept of filter bubbles came from and what it really means. Several examples were raised on both so-called fake news, what is charted about us on social media, post truth and confusion bias.

They think that even though the news situation today can make sense hopelessly and dystopically, it is ultimately about how we ourselves relate to the whole and the responsibility we actually take to get into and control the news we see on the internet. Its mostly up to ourselves, but it has also revealed more official requirements that someone should nevertheless take responsibility for all the information that thrives on the internet. For example, there is now a new report available that addresses just this, compiled by, among others, Jack Werner who previously worked with the Viralgranskaren. (which incidentally won the Social Media Prize 2017)

But what can you do in practice if you want to get as accurate and good news as possible and take you out of the bubble?:

  • Clear cookies and history in your browser
  • Review your privacy settings for services like Google and Facebook
  • Keep in mind that search terms affect search results
  • Disconnect! Embrace, discuss and retrieve facts AFK (away from keyboard)
  • Step outside your comfort zone
  • Create your own opinion

Suggested Reading:

IIS, Online Source Guide.
Filterbubblan.se is a service that lets you see how different debates sound in the three ideological filter bubbles that characterize Swedish domestic politics, from left to right.

Do you want to know more? Mail Sara or Pieta.

Text: Lena Holmberg
Photo: Christel Olsson

The library’s communication team is praised

In October, we received the great message that the library’s own communication team has won Greta Renborg’s award “for a library that has succeeded in a good marketing”. The prize is awarded by the Swedish Library Association and the motivation solved:

The prize for Greta Renborg’s memory gives us to the university library’s communication team for their well-thought-out and accomplished work in marketing their and university activities both outward towards society and other libraries, and towards the university.

The Library Communication Team

The Library Communication Team; Lena Holmberg, Christel Olsson, Lena Wadell, Katharina Nordling, Tandis Talay. Missing in the picture is Klaz Arvidson

Of course, we think it’s really great and yesterday, almost the whole team was in place at the Stockholm City Library to receive the award and celebrate a little.

But what does the communication team actually do in the library? Well, we are working on to share information about the library’s activities in various ways, including via our web, through social media, physical exhibitions, newsletters, Lounge Talks, Library Breakfasts, outreach activities, displaying and other information at the library’s premises. .

Is it something that you think we should work more with in terms of communication? Please keep in touch!

Text: Lena Holmberg
Picture: Katharina Nordling

Do you have the right e-mail registered?

Given that you get late fees on books you return too late, it seems like a good idea to keep track of what email address the library is using to send out reminders – here’s how you find out what address the library has registered for you.

When you have borrowed a book at the library, it is always your responsibility to keep track of what you borrowed and when it has to be returned. If a book is returned late, you will get a fee. To help you keep track of all different dates of return, the library has the service to send out reminder by email just before it is time to return a book. In order for you to receive the emails the library sends, and thus remind you that it is time to return the book, it is important that you have the correct e-mail address registered with the library. With the correct e-mail address we mean an email address that you check daily.

It is easy to check which email address is registered for you at the library. Log in to My Library, under the PERSONAL DATA tab you will see your e-mail address.

If you want to change email, you do it using Ladok under My Pages. Do you think it’s difficult? Come to the library and we will guide when you’re doing it.

Text: Tandis Talay
Picture: Mostphotos

From London with love!

This afternoon we will talk at the Internet Librarian International conference here in London. Our contribution is called Good customer relationships: proving value every day – the sequel.

We were here at the same conference in London 2015 and talked about the ongoing project we were doing at the library then. Now we are back to talk about the continuation that followed that project.

Perhaps it is one or two of you who remembered that for a long time (for a whole two years) we put “sticks” for every question you asked us? It was part of a project where we measured every question we received at the library and divided them into 10 different categories; loan issues, reference questions, questions about printers and copiers, referral questions, how to find in the premises, etc. We wanted to see what kind of questions you ask us. We worked for 106 weeks and received 56,411 questions!

We encountered quite a few exciting things, such as getting the most IT questions at lunchtime, most queries in the mornings, and asking us more at the beginning of the semester than at the end. We also know that 58% of the questions were library issues (ranging from loans, search books, Harvard reference to search in databases-questions). 22% were computer-related issues (printers, copiers, accounts, Word questions etc) and 20% were about to find rooms, book group rooms etc.

These are the results we will present to other library colleagues from around the world this afternoon. And all the data we are here talking about today are all of you – thank you for all questions!

Wish us luck!

Best London Greetings from Tove & Christel

If you want to know all our results, please contact us!