Predatory publishers contacts students

Recently there have been cases of students being contacted by GlobeEdit Publishing, a predatory publisher that wants to publish the students work, the initial contact could look something like this:

“I believe this particular topic could be of interest to a wider audience and we would be glad to consider publishing it.
Should the commercialisation of your work as printed book meet your interest, I will be glad to provide you with further details in an electronic brochure.”

Usualy predatory publishers are interested in you paying the publication cost to make profit off your research. In this case GlobeEdit is offering to publish your work for free, the problem is with the contract; you will loose all rights to your work and they will sell it to make money. GlobeEdit do not care about scientific quality or making your work reach a “wider audience”; they will rather work to limit the access behind a paywall. The student thesis are usually already published and available online through the university repositories.

Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU) is also reporting similar cases.

Always be wary of:
“– Mass emails asking for submissions”. And to quote SLU:

“That students and researchers are being contacted like this is unfortunately a more and more common phenomenon. Be observant and make sure you know who you are dealing with before you sign anything.”

/Thomas Nyström

Predatory publishers – A guide

The guide to form an opinion about predatory open access journals and publishers was published a couple of weeks ago in Swedish and now it has been translated into English.

It is important always to check the journal you choose to publish in so that you do not choose a journal which is missing all the scientific criteria for accepting, reviewing and publishing scientific articles. New predatory journals are born every week and they have new ways to seem more serious and to get citations. These journals charge article processing charge (APC) to publish your article. The APC will not be as high as for Springer or other well-known publishers but they will not work with your article: it will not go through a review process; it will not be edited etc.

The latest way in trying to up the journals impact factor is to buy citations. Some publishers have started to send thank-you e-mails to those who have cited articles from their journals in other publishers’ journals. In these e-mails they say they will not charge you APC if you ever want to publish in one of their journal with the condition that you continue to cite their articles. The aim with this is to increase the number of citations so that the journal’s impact factor will increase. This kind of play with impact factor is unethical and something serious science should not be a part of. Read more of this and other topics on predatory publishers in Jeffery Beall’s blog.

You will find the guide below. Open Acccess and predatory publishers – the guide

Text: Pieta Eklund