Books to read if you’re writing your student thesis

It’s spring term and high season for thesis writing, which can be both scary, hard, interesting, and fun at once – here you will find tips on books that can help you in the process of writing your thesis. They cover the topics research methods and academic writing.

As for the method, this is a central part of the process: What method do you use in your studies, and how do you describe this in the thesis? This is where the method books come to rescue. Some of you have had method courses earlier; others will have a method course just before the thesis writing starts. And you will, of course, get some tips on good books in these courses, but there are other books than the course literature, and you’ll find plenty of books at the library. The largest part of all books on quantitative and qualitative methods can be found at department 300 on level 2.5 in the library.

There are also some good books to read on writing in general, and on academic writing in particular. These books will give you tips and advice when it comes to language (for example how to write in a passive voice instead of in first person), how to formulate different parts of the thesis (how to write the introduction), etcetera. You will find most of these books on shelf 808.066 on floor 4 in the library.

Text & photo: Katharina Nordling

Essay tips – how do I write academic texts

Information searching just isn’t enough – in most cases the information has to be presented to others as well. Here you will find a variety of entrances to web pages, featuring tools to make what you have learned into well written papers and theses or splendid oral presentations.

Writing correct and spell correctly is one of the parts when writing scientific texts. Below are a few tips.

Lund’s University guide on academic writing is an excellent resource and open for all to use.

The Online Writing Lab (OWL) at Purdue University provides resources and instructional materials for academic writing.

The Language Lab offers professional guidance in Swedish, English and Swedish as a Second Language. The Language Lab can provide tools for improving your studies.

Google Translate helps you translate text from one language to another.

Text: Sara Hellberg, translated by Lisa Carlson

Academic texts, part 6: Contents and form

The research’s scientific attitude and how the researchers have reached the results should be made visibile by the contents of the academic text. The author/authors should be very clear which perspective is set on the text and be critical of other’s texts and even one’s own analysis. It is important for the reader to udnerstand what the researcher has done and how it is done no matter what kind of research it is. What kind of ground is there to draw the conclusions? Which interpretations and analysis are made? Transparancy is important when it comes to the ground the research lays on and the methods used. There are of course scientific texts which in one way or another challenges this, either consciously or uncounsciously.

Within many research areas it is important to express yourself clearly, precisely and to use the vocabulary which is standard in the area.

Many articles in scientific journals, conference papers and in some cases even book chapters describe an (more or less experimental) empirical study which is then  interpretated and put in context with other studies. A classic structure for such a text within e.g. Sciences or some Social Sciences is from IMRD-model:

  • Introduction (problem formulation, aim, research questions, previous research, theory)
  • Method (description of method(s) and possible ethical considerations)
  • Results (account for results and analysed results)
  • Discussions (connecting results to previous research and theory, conlusions and possible suggestions for future research)

What actually is written differs from research area to research area – it might be method, theory or to discuss the analysis in connection to previous research. The above is also a model used in doctoral dissertations and in monographs when presenting a larger empirical study (or part studies). One alternative is that each chapter shows an example of a theme which is then discussed in the concluding chapter although a lot of the analyis is written in the chapters through out the book.

Doctoral dissertations are often formed as so called complation thesis (article thesis, thesis by publication). This means that the thesis contains of a number of scientific articles published in scientific journals or conference publications. The articles are  preceded by an introductory or summary chapters where the author has the possibility to discuss the research questions, methods and theory, write a short summary of the articles and then relate them to the research questions and each other and also the draw some conclusions from the results of all of the articles.

Of course there are many ways to structure scientific articles. Scientific publiations may include more that just text, e.g. video, image and diagrams. Try to understand what is normal and usual, and also try to identify what is allowed within your area or studies by using examples that you find.

//Helena Francke, lector at BHS

Blog posts are translated from Swedish by Pieta Eklund.

Academic texts, part 6: Contents and form

The research’s scientific attitude and how the researchers have reached the results should be made visibile by the contents of the academic text. The author/authors should be very clear which perspective is set on the text and be critical of other’s texts and even one’s own analysis. It is important for the reader to udnerstand what the researcher has done and how it is done no matter what kind of research it is. What kind of ground is there to draw the conclusions? Which interpretations and analysis are made? Transparancy is important when it comes to the ground the research lays on and the methods used. There are of course scientific texts which in one way or another challenges this, either consciously or uncounsciously.

Within many research areas it is important to express yourself clearly, precisely and to use the vocabulary which is standard in the area.

Many articles in scientific journals, conference papers and in some cases even book chapters describe an (more or less experimental) empirical study which is then  interpretated and put in context with other studies. A classic structure for such a text within e.g. Sciences or some Social Sciences is from IMRD-model:

  • Introduction (problem formulation, aim, research questions, previous research, theory)
  • Method (description of method(s) and possible ethical considerations)
  • Results (account for results and analysed results)
  • Discussions (connecting results to previous research and theory, conlusions and possible suggestions for future research)

What actually is written differs from research area to research area – it might be method, theory or to discuss the analysis in connection to previous research. The above is also a model used in doctoral dissertations and in monographs when presenting a larger empirical study (or part studies). One alternative is that each chapter shows an example of a theme which is then discussed in the concluding chapter although a lot of the analyis is written in the chapters through out the book.

Doctoral dissertations are often formed as so called complation thesis (article thesis, thesis by publication). This means that the thesis contains of a number of scientific articles published in scientific journals or conference publications. The articles are  preceded by an introductory or summary chapters where the author has the possibility to discuss the research questions, methods and theory, write a short summary of the articles and then relate them to the research questions and each other and also the draw some conclusions from the results of all of the articles.

Of course there are many ways to structure scientific articles. Scientific publiations may include more that just text, e.g. video, image and diagrams. Try to understand what is normal and usual, and also try to identify what is allowed within your area or studies by using examples that you find.

//Helena Francke, lector at BHS

Blog posts are translated from Swedish by Pieta Eklund.