Use DiVA to reach out with your student thesis

The semester is coming to an end and so does the project of writing your student thesis, but when the thesis is done what happens then – who’ll be reading it? Well, that depends on what you as the author choose to do with it. By making it available in the university’s publication database DiVA, the paper can get wings and benefit both yourself and others. For example, you can attach the link to the thesis in your job applications, and let future employers see what you can do. In addition, the thesis will be searchable on the internet and others interested in the topic you wrote about may find and read the thesis.

In order for the thesis to be published in DiVA, you must approve the publication agreement when submitting your thesis.

As the thesis is published in DiVA, it will be searchable in the following fields: name, title, abstract, keyword, language, and subject area. Because both abstract and keywords are something you decide on, it may be a good idea to take your time when writing abstract and choosing keywords, making it easier for others to find the thesis.

If you have any questions about how an abstract should be written, or how to think about choosing keywords, you can get support and help with this at the library’s Search Lab – open every Thursday.

Text: Katharina Nordling

The Phrasebank – get suggenstions on how to write

If you want inspiration when you’re writing an academic text, you could use a Phrasebank.

The University of Manchester has an Academic Phrasebank openly available on their webpage. The Phrasebank gives you tips on how to write academic texts, and examples of good phrases to use when you’re for example writing your Conclusion. The following suggestions are given for when you want to summarize your main research findings:

  • This study has identified …
  • This study has shown that …
  • The research has also shown that …
  • The second major finding was that …
  • These experiments confirmed that …
  • X made no significant difference to …
  • This study has found that generally …
  • The investigation of X has shown that …
  • The results of this investigation show that …
  • X, Y and Z emerged as reliable predictors of …
  • Multiple regression analysis revealed that the …
  • The most obvious finding to emerge from this study is that …
  • The relevance of X is clearly supported by the current findings.
  • One of the more significant findings to emerge from this study is that …

It is of course important to keep in mind that you can’t just pick any phrase from the examples and use it, the phrase has to match your text as well. The main objective when your writing your academic text is to get a consistent and well written text, and in order to get there you have to know what you are writing about. But the Phrasebank is a good help, it can give you inspiration when you’re stuck and don’t know how to continue.

You’ll find the Academic Phrasebank here.

Text: Katharina Nordling
Photo: Mostphotos

Time to choose subject for your thesis? Get inspired by previous students!

For some students at the university it’s time to start thinking about the student thesis, and we are talking about THE student thesis, the one that marks the end of their studies here at the university. When you start thinking about THE thesis, it’s easy to get depressed.

There can be several different reasons for the feelings of depression; but one of the things causing it might be that you don’t know what to write about. You have no idea – totally blank! Or maybe you have a rough idea, but which perspective should you use on your subject? In both these cases it could be a good idea to look at what other students have done before you: What have they written about? Looking at past students work is a way to be inspired (and it’s also a way to realize that it’s not impossible to write a student thesis – many students have done it before you).

There are several different places to search for student theses. If you’re looking for theses published at this university you find them in one of the university publication databases:

  • Search in BADA for student theses published in full text until 2014
  • Search in DiVA for student theses published in full text from 2015

If you want to search for student theses from any of the universities in Sweden, you should try the web site essays.se. Using this web site you can search among over 72,000 different student theses written in English to find inspiration. If you do an advanced search, you can easily limit your search to a certain topic, university, language or publication year.

Good luck in finding the subject for your thesis! If you want help with any of the sources above, don’t hesitate to contact us at the library. You can stop by the Information Point and talk to us in person, or you can send us an e-mail.

Text: Katharina Nordling
Picture: Colourbox & Katharina Nordling

Let the databases help out with referencing

Most student essays and theses require correct referencing, this means that you need to place references to your sources both in the text and in a bibliography or a reference list at the end of your document. The references are sorted in alphabetical order and should contain sufficient information for your readers to easily find the documents you have used in your work.

There are automatic functions available in various search engines to automatically extract citations for a bibliography. Here are some examples:

Primo – www.hb.se/library
The library’s new discovery tool. Here you will find references to our print book collection as well as lots of e-books and articles.

Libris – libris.kb.se
Sweden’s national library catalog. Here you can find books, dissertations, reports and more available at Swedish libraries.

Google Scholar – scholar.google.com 
Here you can do a broad search for scientific literature. You also can find student papers, theses, books, abstracts and articles, from universities and academic publishers here. Note, however, that everything in Google Scholar is not “scientific” but there are still different in content and functions other than the search engine Google.

Adjustments necessary
Please note that the  formatting and content can vary between different search engines – therefore, always make sure that all references in your source list has a consistent look and conforms to your preferred style.

Reference to a book:
Eklund, K. (2007). Our economy: An introduction to the national economy. 11. Edition, Stockholm: Norstedts..

Reference to a journal article:
Elmqvist, C., Brown, D., Fridlund, B., & Ekebergh, M. (2010). Being first on the scene of an accident – experiences of ‘doing’ prehospital emergency care. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, 24 (2), ss. 266-273.

Text: Sara Hellberg
Picture: Colourbox

Think of what you write – make sure not to plagiarize!

Writing an essay or thesis may be perceived as difficult in many ways, one of them might be how to express yourself in a unique way, so you don’t plagiarize someone else’s work. The university has a good anti-plagiarism guide where you get insight into how to avoid, intentionally or inadvertently, plagiarizing. There is also information about what happens if it is discovered that someone has plagiarized.

Text: Katharina Nordling
Photo: Mostphotos

Is it time for your student thesis? Use the Library!

We are almost halfway through the spring semester and for some of our students the final sprint approaches – the student thesis needs to be written – here are some tips on how the library can help you when you’re writing your thesis.

One thing that is common for all students who write their thesis is that they need information to base the thesis on. It may be scientific articles, books on theoretical background or on methods used by students. No matter what kind of information you are looking for, it’s important to realize that the information is the foundation for your thesis. And it’s also important to realize that information seeking is often a very time consuming task, filled of setbacks. But if you make sure to structure your search for information it will all be a lot easier.

But do not despair! The librarians at the Library are experts in structuring information searches, and they are more than happy to help. Please, come to the Library and make sure to get a solid foundation to build your essay on.

There are two options if you want help of a librarian in your information search: You can come to our Search Lab – it is open every Thursday between 12:00-15:00. The Search Lab is staffed by one or two librarians who can help you to structure your searches. During this time the Language Lab is open as well. This means that you can ask language questions, or get tips on how to write your academic text at the same time.

Another option for help in your search for information is to come and get Search Support. Please come to the Information Point at the Library entrance, and the librarians manning the Information Point will help you with your searches.

Remember:  Use the Library, and the librarians, to get yourself a good foundation to build your essay on!

We also want to inform you that there are several posts in this blog full of great tips and advice for students writing their thesis. Here are some of them:

Text: Katharina Nordling
Photos: Colourbox

Is it time to think about you final student thesis?

Is it time to think about which topic you want to write about in you final thesis? Then it’s also good to start thinking about how to find information to your thesis, and of course, about your research questions. Keep reading this blog post and you will get information about how you can approach these things.

The point of the research question is to develop meaningful and relevant results. The idea is to formulate questions which will give you meaningful and relevant results and also to describe your work in a consist manner. Research questions can be descriptive (what is happening, what exists), relational (relationship between two or more variables) or causal (whether one or more variables causes one or more outcome variables).

How do you search for information effectively?
You can always start with Summon, which is the library search service. Here you can find anything from books and articles to e-books etc.

You can also search directly in a subject database. Here you can make specific searches that are focused to your particular subject and you also have more detailed search options.

You can access all of the library´s electronic resources from home – just log in with your username and password (the same as you use in PING PONG).

Libris (the Swedish Library catalogue) can be relevant for your search. Maybe other libraries have good books about your topic, in that case you can make an interlibrary loan which means that we will request the book/article for you. Interlibrary loans of books are free of charge but articles costs 40 SEK (80 SEK if we have to order outside Scandinavia).

Do you want to know more about student thesis writing and information seeking?

  • Call the Library at 033-435 40 50
  • E-mail the Library at biblioteket@hb.se
  • Come and get help at the information desk
  • Visit the Search Lab in J441 every Thursday at 12:00-15:00 and get help from a librarian.

Text: Tandis Talay
Picture: Colourbox