Source criticism and plagiarism

You might be in the midst of searching for scientific articles for your thesis or assignment. Do not forget to think critically when you do this work!

COLOURBOX1947363Source criticism is a method to examine the information and facts contained in the sources you choose to use. You value the sources and choose carefully what you want to include. Do not forget to use source criticism on other than text. For example pictures and video that nowdays are equally important to source view given how much you can edit and process them. Remember to differentiate between a primary source and secondary source. The Academy is considered primary sources (first-hand) to be more reliable. You can use following questions, irrespective of the material:

  • Who is the author of your source?
  • For what purpose is it published?
  • Is the research still relevant?
  • Where have the research been published? Has it been reviewed? ( peer-review)
  • Can other check the results?
  • What information do you get from other sources at the same event?
  • If others have done similar studies, which results have they reached?
  • Does the timing in movies and audio clips add up?
  • Who funded the research?
  • Does the results seem trustworthy? Are there other sources that are trustworthy to say the same thing?
  • Are the conclusions reasonable based on the theory and methodology used?

Take a look at the web page Källlkritik on the Internet which is a guide that .SE stands behind and which shows how you can review content on web pages.

It can be helpful to know what obligations you as the author of your essay or thesis have regarding plagiarism. On the University web you can find a great anti-plagiarism guide where most aspects of this matter are included. It is available through Ping Pong, but also open on the web from this page (click on the link in the text far down on the page).
And please see the movie where our former librarian Eli Bytoft-Nyaas is talking about the subject and deal critically  with sources and references. The anti-plagiarism tutorial included Urkund, a plagiarism handbook that inlcudes a list to look at if you want to know what actually is plagiarism when writing.

Text: Lena Holmberg
Bild. Colourbox

Request a book – here’s how it works

Sometimes the book you need from the library is already on loan, but if you don’t need the book immediately, and you can wait until the person who has borrowed the book has returned it, you can make a request for the book. A request is easily done on your own, and here is a brief description of how you do it:

1. Search for the book in Summon on the Library web page. When you locate the book in the hit list – click on the book title. reservation_summon_eng  2. When you’re at the page with more information about the book, make sure no copy is available in the library – then click the link Make a Request.

reservation_post_eng3. Log in to the system with your UB account.

4. Activate the request by clicking Submit. If you want to, you can change the date for how long the request will be active (an option if you know that if you don’t get the book before a certain date, you don’t need the book at all).

reservationer_reservationen_eng5. Once you’ve clicked Submit you will get a notification that the request was activated properly. If you don’t get this notification – please contact the Information Point.

reservationer_reservationen_gjord_eng6. As soon as the book is available for you we place it on the shelf for reserved books. It will be placed alphabetically by your last name.IMG_32457. Now you’ll receive an e-mail notifying you that the book is waiting for you at the library. The book will be on the shelf, waiting for you for five days, the last pickup date will be specified in the e-mail we sent you.

8. Once you found the book, you borrow it in the machines next to the entrance as usual.


Notice: You cannot make a request for a book that you’ve already borrowed, or a book that you already have an active request for. And if you make a request when there’s a copy of the book available on the shelf – you will just end up in line for the books that are already on loan. So in that case it’s better for you to just come to the library and borrow the copy that’s available.

Text & picture: Katharina Nordling

Is it time for your student thesis?

We are halfway through the spring semester and for some of our students the final sprint approaches – the student thesis needs to be written – here are some tips on how the library can help you when you’re writing your thesis.

One thing that is common for all students who write their thesis is that they need information to base the thesis on. It may be scientific articles, books on theoretical background or on the methods used by the students. No matter what kind of information you are looking for, it’s important to realize that the information is the foundation for your thesis. And it’s also important to realize that information seeking is often a very time consuming task, filled of setbacks. But if you make sure to structure your search for information it will all be a lot easier.

uppsatsBut do not despair! The librarians at the Library are experts in structuring information searches, and they are more than happy to help. Please, come to the Library and make sure to get a solid foundation to build your essay on.

There are two options if you want help of a librarian in your information search: You can come to our Search Lab – it is open every Thursday between 12: 00-15:00. The Search Lab is staffed by one or two librarians who can help you to structure your searches. During this time the Language Lab is open as well. This means that you can ask language questions, or get tips on how to write your academic text in the same time.

Another option for help in your search for information is to come and get Search Support. Please come to the Information Point at the entrance to the Library, and the librarians manning the Information Point will help you with your searches.

Remember:  Use the Library, and the librarians, to get yourself a good foundation to build your essay on!

We also want to inform you that there are several posts in this blog full of great tips and advice to students writing their thesis. Here are some of them:

uppsats2Text: Katharina Nordling
Bild: Colourbox

Publications in Prehospital emergency care

During thursday and friday the PreHospen conference takes place here at the University of Borås. It is the seventh conference in order, and everyone who work in some way with, or are affected by, prehospital emergency medical care are welcome. Here at the university is PreHospen (Center for Prehospital Research), a well-known center for research and development of prehospital emergency care and it’s also one of the leading research centers in this subject in the country.

ambulansbilder12The library have many publications written by researchers at the PreHospen center but also most of the presenters at the conference are represented in the collection. The publications are mainly electronic, but some of the publications in question are available in print. Here you can find links to some of the presenters at the session “The dispatch centre’s impossible task” (both print and electronic) that we have in the library via our search tool Summon:  Anna Carin Wahlberg, Karl Hedman, Helena Nord-LjungquistKatarina Bohm, Araz Rawshani.

Whether you are a resident at the University of Borås, or if you are an external participant in the conference: Welcome to browse our databases and learn more about the subject in different types of publications in the field. In the Library Lounge you also find journals like Samverkan 112 (Collaboration 112) and Vårdfokus (Focus in health) with the latter including articles about various trauma teams in the latest issue (both journals are in Swedish). Please feel free to ask questions about additional literature on the subject at the information points in the library. Only students and staff at the University of Borås can access the material we subscribe to in full text, but we have a few walk-in-use computers at the entrance floor that can be used for a while to browse and read.

DSC_1634Text: Lena Holmberg
Picture: Anna Sigge & Lena Holmberg

Read a journal in our lounge!

lounge

Most of you already know that the library has many electronic journals but there are also a number of printed journals and magazines to read perhaps seated in a sofa or armchair in the library lounge. Here at the ground floor, we chose not to have so much scientific material. Instead you find more trade and professional journals and some more general journals that may interest everyone.

Examples of journals available in the lounge is Library Journal, Science and Camino. Or why not read Cap & Design, or Web designer?

IMG-20160223-WA0001There are also some more general and more interesting, fun and maybe even more relaxing journals like Time magazine, The Economist, National Geographic and others.

Take the opportunity to sit down a moment in the lounge and browse through some magazines, analyzing trends or read a good article in that particular topic that interests you! If you are lucky, no one discovers where you are, and you can read in peace and quiet.

Text: Lena Holmberg
Picture: Katharina Nordling

Encyclopedia Britannica

Encyclopedia Britannica and Britannica Online is an new resource for the University of Borås but we had a subscription once before. we discovered that the Library was missing an encyclopedia with broad reference books in English for our students and teachers. Britannica has long existed as a printed encyclopedia, the latest (and last) 15th edition was printed in 2010.

CaptureB

Encyclopedias works usually much better these days on the internet. Especially if they can be linked to other resources. If you search Summon (the library’s major search) from our English-language website is a spread of keywords in the Encyclopedia Britannica and you can get a definition of a word or an explanatory article on a subject directly Summon.

In addition to search and read articles, Britannica is offering a so-called workspace in the encyclopedia. By acquiring a personal account on Britannica you can save articles, pictures and also write your own notes which can then be used in your own work and research.

Here are demos of how the database works.

Text: Martin Borg

Free access to research information in a public health emergency

In September 2015 the World Health Organization (WHO) set global norms for sharing research data and results when there’s a public health emargency arising, now the norms are being used for the first time.

share-informationIt was after the Ebola outbreak in several countries in West African as it became clear that the current methods of data sharing had major flaws. In order to enhance the data sharing, WHO decided to develop global guidelines that could be used when a major public health threat occurred in the future. The guidelines states that research data and research results should be made public as quickly as possible in order to facilitate further research in the subject. In its guidelines WHO writes, among other things:

Every researcher that engages in generation of information related to a public health emergency or acute public health event with the potential to progress to an emergency has the fundamental moral obligation to share preliminary results once they are adequately quality controlled for release. The onus is on the researcher, and the funder supporting the work, to disseminate information through pre-publication mechanisms, unless publication can occur immediately using post-publication peer review processes.

WHO is also very clear that they want to see a paradigm shift in the approach to sharing information in connection with emergencies. They want to leave the current approach, in which the magazine’s publishing timelines control when the information can be disseminated. Instead, the WHO wants the information to be disseminated openly through what they call “modern fit-for-purpose pre-publication platforms”. They explicitly call researchers, journals and funders to commit to the paradigm shift – to make it happen.

With the Zika virus spreading in South zikaAmerica WHO guidelines came into force for the first time earlier this month. On February 1, WHO declared that there was a so-called Public Health Emergency of International Concern. This led to that the guidelines came into force, and the WHO has opened Zika Open, a portal where research data and research results of the Zika virus are made available to the public. Several major journal publishers have created portals to make research on the Zika virus published in their journals available openly.

Hopefully, sharing research results and data will lead to more knowledge about the Zika virus, and maybe even a way to treat it. Couldn’t we think of this as “one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind”?

Text: Katharina Nordling
Picture: Colourbox