The Nobel Prize 2017 – a brief summary

On Sunday it’s the Nobel Day again; here you will get a brief presentation of the prizes and the research behind them, as well as some tips for further reading on each prize.

Medicine

This year’s Nobel Prize in Medicine is shared between three different researchers; the prize is divided equally between Jeffery C Hall, Michael Rosbash and Michael W. Young. They are awarded the prize for their research on the biological clock that all living organisms have inside. That living organisms adapts to the differens phases of the day have been known for a long time, but Hall, Rosbash and Young have found out how this 24-hour cycle actually works. This has led to the development of a new fast-growing research field, important for human health (1).

If you want to read some of the articles where the research behind the prize is presented, you’ll find three of them in the library’s collections.

Physics

This year’s Nobel Prize in Physics is also shared between three different researchers. Half the prize goes to Rainer Weiss and the other half is divided between Barry C. Barish and Kip  S. Thorne. All these three researchers have participated in research on the universe’s gravitational waves. The waves, which was predicted by Albert Einstein a hundred years ago, was finally captured in 2015. This is ground breaking and something that will revolutionize astrophysics as new unseen worlds open up. There will be a plenty of new discoveries about the universe to be made by those who succeed in capturing gravity waves (2).

A big collaborative project for this research is LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory) where all three reserachers are involved (2).

Chemistry

This year’s Nobel Prize in Chemistry is, as the previous two prizes presented, shared by three researchers, namely Jacques Dubochet, Joachim Frank and Richard Henderson, who equally share the prize. These three researchers get the prize for their contributions to the development of a method that has played a major role in the development of biochemistry. The method is called cryo-electron microscopy and is used to develop three-dimensional structures in atomic resolution of biomolecules. Among other things, it has been used to take prints on proteins that cause antibiotic resistance and the zika virus (which can be seen in the image to the right) (3).

If your search in Primo, you will find plenty of articles where the method has been used.

Litteratur

This year’s Nobel Prize in Literature is awarded to Kazuo Ishiguro “who, in novels of great emotional force, has uncovered the abyss beneath our illusory sense of connection with the world” (4). Ishiguro’s stories often explores the themes: memory, time and self-delusion, something that becomes very clear in his most famous novel The Remains of the Day – a book that also became a film with, among others, Anthony Hopkins (5). Here you will find a list of all the books available in the library’s collections.

Fredspriset

This year’s Peace Prize is awarded to the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (ICAN), according to the Norwegian Nobel Committee, “the organization is receiving the award for its work to draw attention to the catastrophic humanitarian consequences of any use of nuclear weapons and for its ground-breaking efforts to achieve a treaty-based prohibition of such weapons”. Among other things, the campaign has been the driving force behind that the UN member states adopted the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons (6). At the award ceremony in Oslo, Executive Director of the campaign Beatrice Fihn will receive the prize together with Setsuko Thurlow nuclear bomb survivor, who was 13 years old when her hometown Hiroshima was bombed by the United States in 1945 (7). The image comes from one of ICAN’s campaign events around the world.

Ekonomi

The Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel is this year awarded to Richard H. Thaler for his contribution to the behavioral economics. Thaler’s research moves within three subjects: limited rationality, social preferences and lack of self-control. The results within these three areas have laid the foundation for the new and rapidly expanding research area of behavioral economics. In the library there are two of Thaler’s books, including Nudge: Improving Decisions about Health, Wealth and Happiness – which is about how we daily make a lot of different decisions, but unfortunately it is often quite bad decisions we make. The book is thus about what we can do to make better decisions. In addition, there are a lot of articles by Thaler to read – here is a list of those found in the library collections.


(1) The Nobel Assembly at Karolinska Institutet (2017). Press release 2017-10-02.
(2) The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences (2017). Press release 2017-10-03.
(3) The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences (2017). Press release 2017-10-04.
(4) Svenska Akademien (2017). Press release 2017-10-05.
(5) Svenska Akademien (2017). Biobibliographical notes.
(6) Den Norske Nobelkomite (2017). Press release 2017-10-06.
(7) ICAN (2017). Atomic bomb survivor to jointly accept Nobel Peace Prize on ICAN’s behalf. 
(8) The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences (2017). Press release 2017-10-09.

Text: Katharina Nordling
Bilder: Mostphotos (om inte annat anges).

How can I find the book in the library?

Do you think it’s tricky to find books in the library? We have a great guide on the web that you can look at, and then you know how you should proceed.

All libraries are structured in a specific way in order to make it possible to find books. To find a book in any library: Always start by searching.

In our library you use Primo at the library’s website to find the exact shelf placement for the book. By searching Primo you will also see directly if the book is at the shelf or not.
Here we see that the book should be found on floor 1 at the course book shelf where all books are not for loan. There are all the books sorted alphabetically. But this book is also for loan at another shelf on the 4th floor at shelf 808.066 Once you are at the right shelf, the books are arranged in alphabetical order, usually by author but sometimes the title. Therefore it is important to always search for the book on the web first, before you go up on the shelf. How is the book placed within the shelf? In this case, on the title.

Hopefully you have now found the book and can borrow it!

A few years ago our library left the Swedish SAB system which divided different subjects using letter combinations. We then introduced the US classification system Dewey Decimal Classification (DDC), which is based on numbers. This meant relocating virtually all the books in the entire library. It was a pretty demanding job, both physically and for our library system but all went well and today DDC is the system we use (with some exceptions such as fiction and older literature on the first floor).

Text and photo: Lena Holmberg

The Library Breakfast offered talk about filter bubbles and source criticism

Yesterday, there was a Library Breakfast at the library again, this time with the subject of filter bubbles and source criticism. Sara Hellberg and Pieta Eklund briefly explained where the concept of filter bubbles came from and what it really means. Several examples were raised on both so-called fake news, what is charted about us on social media, post truth and confusion bias.

They think that even though the news situation today can make sense hopelessly and dystopically, it is ultimately about how we ourselves relate to the whole and the responsibility we actually take to get into and control the news we see on the internet. Its mostly up to ourselves, but it has also revealed more official requirements that someone should nevertheless take responsibility for all the information that thrives on the internet. For example, there is now a new report available that addresses just this, compiled by, among others, Jack Werner who previously worked with the Viralgranskaren. (which incidentally won the Social Media Prize 2017)

But what can you do in practice if you want to get as accurate and good news as possible and take you out of the bubble?:

  • Clear cookies and history in your browser
  • Review your privacy settings for services like Google and Facebook
  • Keep in mind that search terms affect search results
  • Disconnect! Embrace, discuss and retrieve facts AFK (away from keyboard)
  • Step outside your comfort zone
  • Create your own opinion

Suggested Reading:

IIS, Online Source Guide.
Filterbubblan.se is a service that lets you see how different debates sound in the three ideological filter bubbles that characterize Swedish domestic politics, from left to right.

Do you want to know more? Mail Sara or Pieta.

Text: Lena Holmberg
Photo: Christel Olsson

How much are you allowed to copy?

Students tend to copy a lot; books, articles, lecture notes and other things. In this blog post we focus on books – how much of a book are you allowed to copy?

There is an agreement that regulates copying for students and teachers at universities in Sweden. The agreement is made between the organisation Bonus Copyright Accessand The Association of Swedish Higher Education.

First, one can consider what “a copy” is. According the agreement the following activities equals copying:

  • Photocopy
  • Print
  • Download
  • Scanning
  • Save a digital file

So now we know what a copy is, time to look into the heart of the matter: How much are you allowed to copy?

The 15/15-rule is central in the agreement. This rule me15ans that you are allowed to copy 15 % of a book, but no more than 15 pages (every six month). So – if you have a 100 page book, you are allowed to copy 15 pages from this book. If you have a 200 page book (15 % of the book is 30 pages), you may copy 15 pages of the book. And if you have a 60 page book (where 15 % are 9 pages), you may copy 9 pages.

Here’s a brochure summarizing the agreement, if you want to read about other aspects of the agreement.

In conclusion: You may copy 15 %, or 15 pages, of a book you’re going to use in your studies.

If you do not follow the agreement for copying, for example by copying more than you are allowed to, you are guilty of infringement of copyright, and that may result in a liability to pay damages.

Text: Katharina Nordling
Pictures: Colourbox

The library’s communication team is praised

In October, we received the great message that the library’s own communication team has won Greta Renborg’s award “for a library that has succeeded in a good marketing”. The prize is awarded by the Swedish Library Association and the motivation solved:

The prize for Greta Renborg’s memory gives us to the university library’s communication team for their well-thought-out and accomplished work in marketing their and university activities both outward towards society and other libraries, and towards the university.

The Library Communication Team

The Library Communication Team; Lena Holmberg, Christel Olsson, Lena Wadell, Katharina Nordling, Tandis Talay. Missing in the picture is Klaz Arvidson

Of course, we think it’s really great and yesterday, almost the whole team was in place at the Stockholm City Library to receive the award and celebrate a little.

But what does the communication team actually do in the library? Well, we are working on to share information about the library’s activities in various ways, including via our web, through social media, physical exhibitions, newsletters, Lounge Talks, Library Breakfasts, outreach activities, displaying and other information at the library’s premises. .

Is it something that you think we should work more with in terms of communication? Please keep in touch!

Text: Lena Holmberg
Picture: Katharina Nordling

Hi Signe Wulund!

In a series of portraits we are going to introduce the staff at the Library to all our readers and customers. Who are the people working at the library? And what are they doing there? Read our portraits and get to know your librarians! We asked Lena a few questions.

 

What are your main duties?

Since about 6 weeks ago I work with research support in the Digital Services function. This means that I (when I get a bit more experience) will be the person to help and inform researchers, PhD students and administrators about issues regarding for example the publication database DiVA, Open Access and research data management. I’ll naturally also be available at the InformationPoint and do a lot of other things behind the scenes – it’s going to be exciting to see exactly what my roles develops into eventually.

What where you doing before you started working here?

That’s a good question. I’ve done a lot of random stuff! The last five years I’ve been living in Cambridge where I had a research support role at the University. Before that I was a children’s librarian at the fantastic public library in Nynäshamn south of Stockholm. I arrived there from Japan, where I among other experiences managed to study Japanese and teach Naval English at a coast guard headquarter. I did my Masters in Library and Information Science at Uppsala University, and they had an exchange program through which I ended up in Japan the first time.

What do you do when you’re not at work?

Right now I’m furnishing a brand new rental apartment, and trying to get to know Borås. I’m completely new here, and I came from England with two suitcases and nothing else. We have boxes of books (and other stuff too) coming eventually, but as we had rented a furnished place in Cambridge there’s a lot of IKEA and running around Knalleland going on right now. I really miss hanging out in the couch with my wife and our two cats, but fortunately they are also moving here to Borås from England in the beginning of December. And I look forward to getting back out in the Swedish nature!

What made you apply to the library at the University of Borås?

I had set up a notification for jobs in Sweden with keywords like “open access”, and when I saw that the University of Borås was looking for a digital services librarian it felt like an amazing chance. After all, this is the heart of Swedish library studies, and I couldn’t imagine a better combination than a work place where I could use the specialist knowledge I’d gained at the University of Cambridge and at the same time learn a lot of new things in the field. And that proved true the very first day, when I got to listen in on a lecture to Library and Information Science students some of my colleagues gave.

Did you know from the beginning that you wanted to work with researchers and publications?

Not at all – this has really happened by pure chance! I started as a temp in Cambridge, and pretty early I ended up in various administrative departments where I helped out with exactly research support and publications. I quickly became involved in questions regarding the open access of publication and research data, and that’s how I ended up here. I feel that it’s a very exciting area that is also developing extremely rapidly, at the same time as it’s important for libraries and higher education institutions to keep up and communicate everything it means to those who are directly affected by the relevant requirements and policies.

Do you have any book tips you want to share?

I like everything from NK Jemisin, but the just-completed broken Earth trilogy is probably the best she’s written so far. It is crude and majestic fantasy in the borderland to SF where she confronts many difficult questions. No wonder that the first two parts won each Hugo. Yoon Ha Lee has so far two books out in the series Machineries of the Empire, where the first part was so good that I read it again after six months just to get to experience it again. He writes SF that feels like watching a colourful animated film. Ada Palmer won the John W. Campbell Award in the category of Best newcomer with her future vision Too like the lightning, which I can really understand-. It also doesn’t resemble anything I’ve read before. I’m now waiting tense for her The will to Battle that’s coming out in December.

Text: Tandis Talay and Signe Wulund
Picture: Tandis Talay

Do you have the right e-mail registered?

Given that you get late fees on books you return too late, it seems like a good idea to keep track of what email address the library is using to send out reminders – here’s how you find out what address the library has registered for you.

When you have borrowed a book at the library, it is always your responsibility to keep track of what you borrowed and when it has to be returned. If a book is returned late, you will get a fee. To help you keep track of all different dates of return, the library has the service to send out reminder by email just before it is time to return a book. In order for you to receive the emails the library sends, and thus remind you that it is time to return the book, it is important that you have the correct e-mail address registered with the library. With the correct e-mail address we mean an email address that you check daily.

It is easy to check which email address is registered for you at the library. Log in to My Library, under the PERSONAL DATA tab you will see your e-mail address.

If you want to change email, you do it using Ladok under My Pages. Do you think it’s difficult? Come to the library and we will guide when you’re doing it.

Text: Tandis Talay
Picture: Mostphotos