Have a great summer!

The library blog now takes a break and returns just in time for the autumn term. The Library stays open all summer but with limited opening hours that you can fins on our contact page. You can access our databases and e-books from home via the web as usual.

We hope you get a really nice summer with lots of reading, relaxation, sun and bath.
See you in august!

The staff at the Library wishes you a great summer!

 

 

 

 

 

Text: Lena Holmberg
Picture: Katharina Nordling

 

Hi Lena Holmberg!

In a series of portraits we are going to introduce the staff at the Library to all our readers and customers. Who are the people working at the library? And what are they doing there? Read our portraits and get to know your librarians! We asked Lena a few questions.

How long have you been working here?
I celebrated ten years as an employee in 2015 and is now in my twelfth year. The years go fast when you have fun! I have always had tasks related to acquisitions, but I have also once taken care of our lovely student assistants who we called library guards at the time. A fun task!

What are your main duties?
I’m part of the function Media, where I purchase literature for the Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare. I’m also responsible for interlibrary loans, which means everything from ensuring that both researchers and students get books and articles they can not find at the University Library, to invoicing and development of systems and routines. I’m also a member of the library’s communication team where I mainly work with social media but also other communication channels. Like most of the librarians, I also have scheduled time at the information desk a few times a week. Although the last six months I have spent most of my time as a working member in the project group for implementing a new library system, which has been both tough and frustrating but at the same time fun and educational!

What do you enjoy most about the job?
To help people, to help users get that article they need for their dissertation, or to make the students feel great when the leave the library after helping them a bit along the way. It’s also fun (and a challenge) to try and get information about the library to our users in a good way. In addition, having lovely colleagues makes life at work fun everyday.

What do you do when you’re not at work?
I’m a nerd that devour both movies, TV shows and I like to go to the cinema, theater, museum and I also read quite a lot of fiction as soon as I get a free time. I have a family who I spend a lot of time with and we often play boardgames together and as long as the kids are small, we like to be out geocaching or chasing Pokémons, but sometimes I force them to a cultural event instead.

Do you have any book tips you want to share?
I have a lot! but I’ll settle with three: Sara Lövestam’s books about the paperless private detective Kouplan provide insight into a whole different life than many of us live today, start with Sanning med modifikation (only available in Swedish). A dramatic and intense novel of my taste is Butcher’s Crossing by John Williams. It is about hunting buffalo but equally about the pursuit of your self. If you instead feel like having a funny reading experience, you have to read Christer Lundberg’s Bläckfisken (only available in Swedish). A tall tale that takes place in Gothenburg and in its madness gives many good laughs.

Text: Tandis Talay & Lena Holmberg
Foto: Tandis Talay

Let the databases help out with referencing

Most student essays and theses require correct referencing, this means that you need to place references to your sources both in the text and in a bibliography or a reference list at the end of your document. The references are sorted in alphabetical order and should contain sufficient information for your readers to easily find the documents you have used in your work.

There are automatic functions available in various search engines to automatically extract citations for a bibliography. Here are some examples:

Primo – www.hb.se/library
The library’s new discovery tool. Here you will find references to our print book collection as well as lots of e-books and articles.

Libris – libris.kb.se
Sweden’s national library catalog. Here you can find books, dissertations, reports and more available at Swedish libraries.

Google Scholar – scholar.google.com 
Here you can do a broad search for scientific literature. You also can find student papers, theses, books, abstracts and articles, from universities and academic publishers here. Note, however, that everything in Google Scholar is not “scientific” but there are still different in content and functions other than the search engine Google.

Adjustments necessary
Please note that the  formatting and content can vary between different search engines – therefore, always make sure that all references in your source list has a consistent look and conforms to your preferred style.

Reference to a book:
Eklund, K. (2007). Our economy: An introduction to the national economy. 11. Edition, Stockholm: Norstedts..

Reference to a journal article:
Elmqvist, C., Brown, D., Fridlund, B., & Ekebergh, M. (2010). Being first on the scene of an accident – experiences of ‘doing’ prehospital emergency care. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, 24 (2), ss. 266-273.

Text: Sara Hellberg
Picture: Colourbox

How about a novel about a dystopian future?

Since the installation of Donald Trump as president of the United States, George Orwell’s 1984 book has climbed up on the bestseller lists in the United States. This is believed to be associated with the use of the term “alternative facts” in an interview by President Donald Trump’s advisor, Keyllyanne Conway. Comparisons were made with the term “newspeak” used in Orwell’s novel from 1949.

1984 is about the oppression in a totalitarian state and a society where all individual freedom has been wiped out. Not even the language of the individual, thoughts or feelings are free. The invisible dictator is constantly present (“Big Brother sees you”). Orwell’s fear was an authoritarian Stalinist future in Britain. The threats may look different today, here’s a list of other known dystopis:

The Handmaid´s tale av Margret Atwood
The Handmaid’s tale is the much discussed story of Offred, service woman in the Republic of Gilead – formerly known as the United States of America – in a near future. In this religious dictatorship, women are no longer allowed to read and have only human dignity in the reproductive sense.

Brave new world av Aldous Huxley
Brave new world is a cornerstone of science fiction classic literature. In the distant future, World Controllers have created the perfect society through genetic manipulation of the population, brainwashing, free drugs and temporary sex. The only one who doesn’t seem to accept the role of a happy consumer is Bernard Marx, who has unnatural addictions for loneliness and disgust for loose that drives him to seek freedom. The only cure he knows can be found in the Savage Reservation, where the old terrible lifestyle remains.

Children of men av P. D. James
Children of men take place in England in 2021, at a time when no children are born on a quarter of a century because all men are hopelessly sterile. Old people are encouraged to commit suicide, immigrant workers are used as slaves and the last born generation, The Omegas, is beautiful but also known for acts of cruelty. The book was filmed in 2006 by Alfonso Cuarón and nominated for three Oscars.

Virutal light av William Gibson
Virtual Light is a detective story placed in a high-tech and multicultural, but decayed future. The place is San Francisco and the year 2005. The bike bid Chevette Washington accidentally end up on a party for filthy wealthy people. She happens to steal a pair of sunglasses by a cheeky guy, but the sunglasses, which do not have a thing to do with sun protection, contains optically stored information and the owner is ready to kill to get them back.

Text: Karin Ekström
Photo: Katharina Nordling

Searching for articles in Primo – here’s how it works!

To search Primo is very much like searching our previous discovery system Summon, although there are some differences – in this blog post we will give you some guidance on how to use Primo to find articles! Use the search box at the Library start page as usual.

  • To locate a known article, just enter the title of the article and click the search button.
  • To find articles on a specific subject, enter your initial search terms and click the search button.

  • All articles in the results shall be available through the Library’s journal subscriptions. Click the ”Full text available” link to get to the article.

  • If you are looking for research articles you can start by applying the following settings:

  • Use the filters menu on the left side to further narrow down your search. You can easily remove filters one by one by clicking the x or remove all settings with “Reset filters”. You can narrow by language, year of publication, peer reviewed materials and more.

  • A new feature in Primo is the possibility to save your searches for future use. If you are not already logged in, start by clicking “Sign in” and then “Save query” in the menu bar:

  • Click the Pin icon to save interesting articles to a favorites list on your Primo account. Selected articles will be marked with a yellow colour in the results list.

  • Access your saved search queries and saved articles (My Favorites) by clicking the:

  • To get back to your search click the:
  • Click the three dots icon in the results list to access an options menu where you can create citations, links and send the link by e-mail to yourself or to someone else.

Please don’t hesitate to contact us if you have any questions about how to use Primo!

Text: Sara Hellberg

Reservation for book in Primo – here’s how it works

If you have been searching for a book in Primo and it turns out to be on loan (and you don’t need the book the same day), you might want to make a reservation for the book. Now you can easily make reservations on your own in Primo; here is a brief description of how it works:

1. Search for the book in Primo on the Library web page. When you locate the book in the hit list – click on the book title.

2. Log in to the system with your UB-account.

3. Click the Request link. It will only be available if all copies of the book are on loan. If there are copies available in the Library, the link will not be there (because it is not possible to reserve books when there are copies available for loan).

4. Click the Request button. If you want to, you can change the date for how long the request will be active (an opportunity if you know that if you don’t get the book before a certain date, you don’t need the book at all).

5. Once you’ve clicked Request you will get a notification that the request was activated. If you don’t get this notification – please contact the Information Point.

6. As soon as the book is available for you we place it on the shelf for reserved books. It will be placed alphabetically by your last name.

7. Now you’ll receive an e-mail notifying you that the book is waiting for you at the library. The book will be on the shelf, waiting for you for five days, the last pickup date will be specified in the e-mail we sent you.

8. Once you found the book, you borrow it in the machines next to the entrance as usual.


Notice: You cannot make a request for a book that you’ve already borrowed, or a book that you already have an active request for.

Text & picture: Katharina Nordling