How can I find the book in the library?

Do you think it’s tricky to find books in the library? We have a great guide on the web that you can look at, and then you know how you should proceed.

All libraries are structured in a specific way in order to make it possible to find books. To find a book in any library: Always start by searching.

In our library you use Primo at the library’s website to find the exact shelf placement for the book. By searching Primo you will also see directly if the book is at the shelf or not.
Here we see that the book should be found on floor 1 at the course book shelf where all books are not for loan. There are all the books sorted alphabetically. But this book is also for loan at another shelf on the 4th floor at shelf 808.066 Once you are at the right shelf, the books are arranged in alphabetical order, usually by author but sometimes the title. Therefore it is important to always search for the book on the web first, before you go up on the shelf. How is the book placed within the shelf? In this case, on the title.

Hopefully you have now found the book and can borrow it!

A few years ago our library left the Swedish SAB system which divided different subjects using letter combinations. We then introduced the US classification system Dewey Decimal Classification (DDC), which is based on numbers. This meant relocating virtually all the books in the entire library. It was a pretty demanding job, both physically and for our library system but all went well and today DDC is the system we use (with some exceptions such as fiction and older literature on the first floor).

Text and photo: Lena Holmberg

The Library Breakfast offered talk about filter bubbles and source criticism

Yesterday, there was a Library Breakfast at the library again, this time with the subject of filter bubbles and source criticism. Sara Hellberg and Pieta Eklund briefly explained where the concept of filter bubbles came from and what it really means. Several examples were raised on both so-called fake news, what is charted about us on social media, post truth and confusion bias.

They think that even though the news situation today can make sense hopelessly and dystopically, it is ultimately about how we ourselves relate to the whole and the responsibility we actually take to get into and control the news we see on the internet. Its mostly up to ourselves, but it has also revealed more official requirements that someone should nevertheless take responsibility for all the information that thrives on the internet. For example, there is now a new report available that addresses just this, compiled by, among others, Jack Werner who previously worked with the Viralgranskaren. (which incidentally won the Social Media Prize 2017)

But what can you do in practice if you want to get as accurate and good news as possible and take you out of the bubble?:

  • Clear cookies and history in your browser
  • Review your privacy settings for services like Google and Facebook
  • Keep in mind that search terms affect search results
  • Disconnect! Embrace, discuss and retrieve facts AFK (away from keyboard)
  • Step outside your comfort zone
  • Create your own opinion

Suggested Reading:

IIS, Online Source Guide.
Filterbubblan.se is a service that lets you see how different debates sound in the three ideological filter bubbles that characterize Swedish domestic politics, from left to right.

Do you want to know more? Mail Sara or Pieta.

Text: Lena Holmberg
Photo: Christel Olsson

How much are you allowed to copy?

Students tend to copy a lot; books, articles, lecture notes and other things. In this blog post we focus on books – how much of a book are you allowed to copy?

There is an agreement that regulates copying for students and teachers at universities in Sweden. The agreement is made between the organisation Bonus Copyright Accessand The Association of Swedish Higher Education.

First, one can consider what “a copy” is. According the agreement the following activities equals copying:

  • Photocopy
  • Print
  • Download
  • Scanning
  • Save a digital file

So now we know what a copy is, time to look into the heart of the matter: How much are you allowed to copy?

The 15/15-rule is central in the agreement. This rule me15ans that you are allowed to copy 15 % of a book, but no more than 15 pages (every six month). So – if you have a 100 page book, you are allowed to copy 15 pages from this book. If you have a 200 page book (15 % of the book is 30 pages), you may copy 15 pages of the book. And if you have a 60 page book (where 15 % are 9 pages), you may copy 9 pages.

Here’s a brochure summarizing the agreement, if you want to read about other aspects of the agreement.

In conclusion: You may copy 15 %, or 15 pages, of a book you’re going to use in your studies.

If you do not follow the agreement for copying, for example by copying more than you are allowed to, you are guilty of infringement of copyright, and that may result in a liability to pay damages.

Text: Katharina Nordling
Pictures: Colourbox

The library’s communication team is praised

In October, we received the great message that the library’s own communication team has won Greta Renborg’s award “for a library that has succeeded in a good marketing”. The prize is awarded by the Swedish Library Association and the motivation solved:

The prize for Greta Renborg’s memory gives us to the university library’s communication team for their well-thought-out and accomplished work in marketing their and university activities both outward towards society and other libraries, and towards the university.

The Library Communication Team

The Library Communication Team; Lena Holmberg, Christel Olsson, Lena Wadell, Katharina Nordling, Tandis Talay. Missing in the picture is Klaz Arvidson

Of course, we think it’s really great and yesterday, almost the whole team was in place at the Stockholm City Library to receive the award and celebrate a little.

But what does the communication team actually do in the library? Well, we are working on to share information about the library’s activities in various ways, including via our web, through social media, physical exhibitions, newsletters, Lounge Talks, Library Breakfasts, outreach activities, displaying and other information at the library’s premises. .

Is it something that you think we should work more with in terms of communication? Please keep in touch!

Text: Lena Holmberg
Picture: Katharina Nordling

Here’s how it works: Returning books

How it works: In a series of blog posts we try to make the library more understandable to our users. What’s happening in the library? What is the purpose of different machines? What rules are there and why? Read and get some explanations and tips regarding the library!

The foundation of the whole idea of Library is to borrow the books, nowadays libraries do (and are) a lot of other things as well, but to borrow books to people is often seen as the library core. The term borrowing something implies that you also need to return the same something: A borrowed book must be returned. In recent years, the management of this aterlamning(returning books) are increasingly taken over by machines. Today we’re going show you the library’s automated book return machine.

At the outside of the library (but inside the university building) is a green treadmill sticking out from a hole in the wall. This is the public part of the automated book return machine. This is where you return your borrowed book. You place the book on the treadmill and the book disappears into the wall. But what happens then? The following film is shot while standing opposite the position where you return the book:

The book continues on the treadmill, and is then sorted into one of five carriages depending on which floor the book should be located on. Which of the five carriages that is right for your book is decided by information about the books location in the library, stored in a chip inside the book. The initial sort is only a rough sorting, the staff at the library sorts each of the carriages more thoroughly, before the books are placed on the right shelf in the library again.

One of sorting carriages is for books that there’s a “problem” with. Books that are returned way passed the due date of the loan, or books that are reserved by someone else. These books require manual intervention and are always handled by staff at the library.

The automated book return machine also activates the alarm on all returned (the alarm is deactivated when you borrow a book).

The automated book return machine at our library is quite small, it only has five differens sorting carriages. At other, bigger libraries the machines can have many more sorting possibilities – for example: Check out this film from Boulder Public Library that has a rather big sorting machine.

Text, picture and movie: Katharina Nordling

From London with love!

This afternoon we will talk at the Internet Librarian International conference here in London. Our contribution is called Good customer relationships: proving value every day – the sequel.

We were here at the same conference in London 2015 and talked about the ongoing project we were doing at the library then. Now we are back to talk about the continuation that followed that project.

Perhaps it is one or two of you who remembered that for a long time (for a whole two years) we put “sticks” for every question you asked us? It was part of a project where we measured every question we received at the library and divided them into 10 different categories; loan issues, reference questions, questions about printers and copiers, referral questions, how to find in the premises, etc. We wanted to see what kind of questions you ask us. We worked for 106 weeks and received 56,411 questions!

We encountered quite a few exciting things, such as getting the most IT questions at lunchtime, most queries in the mornings, and asking us more at the beginning of the semester than at the end. We also know that 58% of the questions were library issues (ranging from loans, search books, Harvard reference to search in databases-questions). 22% were computer-related issues (printers, copiers, accounts, Word questions etc) and 20% were about to find rooms, book group rooms etc.

These are the results we will present to other library colleagues from around the world this afternoon. And all the data we are here talking about today are all of you – thank you for all questions!

Wish us luck!

Best London Greetings from Tove & Christel

If you want to know all our results, please contact us!

Test two practical databases!

HS Talks – The Business and Management Collection and Sage Research Methods are two databases that the library wants to recommend as they look a bit different from many of our other databases. They contain lots of film material, case studies, interviews and various practical tools which can be valuable for both students, teachers and researchers in their ongoing work.

HS Talks is aimed primarily at those interested in business administration, leadership, accounting and marketing. It contains over 900 recorded lectures, case studies and interviews in these subjects. The readers have prominent positions at universities and companies in a number of countries. There are long and short lectures and the service is easy to use. You can watch movies on the computer (both PC and Mac) and mobile devices (Android and iOS). HS Talks is one of the library’s permanent databases that you can access  to as usual via our database page.

Sage Research methods focus more on you as a researcher, PhD and student in general.  Also on anyone who wants tips on how to plan ytheir work/the research process. It is a tool that helps you with method courses, essay writing and dissertation. There are short video and real case studies and data sets for certain methods. We are currently testing this database until October 31, so please try  it and let us know what you think! You find it on the page for trial access to databases.

Text& Picture: Lena