Welcome to a new semester at the Library!

Now the autumn semester 2017 is starting and we want to welcome you to the Library as a student, old or new! Come to us if you need help to find books, information searching, find a nice place to sit and study or maybe just read a journal in the lounge . You can get tips on how to search for scientific material, write references, and how to copy and print. Our web offers a wide range of databases, journals, e-books and much more and it is always open 24/7. The library itself has the following opening hours during the semester and did you know that you can also return books when the library is closed?

Psst, please follow us in social media and get tips, you find us on Facebook and Instagram.

Welcome to the library!

Text: Lena Holmberg
Bild: Anna Sigge

 

Have a great summer!

The library blog now takes a break and returns just in time for the autumn term. The Library stays open all summer but with limited opening hours that you can fins on our contact page. You can access our databases and e-books from home via the web as usual.

We hope you get a really nice summer with lots of reading, relaxation, sun and bath.
See you in august!

The staff at the Library wishes you a great summer!

 

 

 

 

 

Text: Lena Holmberg
Picture: Katharina Nordling

 

Hi Lena Holmberg!

In a series of portraits we are going to introduce the staff at the Library to all our readers and customers. Who are the people working at the library? And what are they doing there? Read our portraits and get to know your librarians! We asked Lena a few questions.

How long have you been working here?
I celebrated ten years as an employee in 2015 and is now in my twelfth year. The years go fast when you have fun! I have always had tasks related to acquisitions, but I have also once taken care of our lovely student assistants who we called library guards at the time. A fun task!

What are your main duties?
I’m part of the function Media, where I purchase literature for the Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare. I’m also responsible for interlibrary loans, which means everything from ensuring that both researchers and students get books and articles they can not find at the University Library, to invoicing and development of systems and routines. I’m also a member of the library’s communication team where I mainly work with social media but also other communication channels. Like most of the librarians, I also have scheduled time at the information desk a few times a week. Although the last six months I have spent most of my time as a working member in the project group for implementing a new library system, which has been both tough and frustrating but at the same time fun and educational!

What do you enjoy most about the job?
To help people, to help users get that article they need for their dissertation, or to make the students feel great when the leave the library after helping them a bit along the way. It’s also fun (and a challenge) to try and get information about the library to our users in a good way. In addition, having lovely colleagues makes life at work fun everyday.

What do you do when you’re not at work?
I’m a nerd that devour both movies, TV shows and I like to go to the cinema, theater, museum and I also read quite a lot of fiction as soon as I get a free time. I have a family who I spend a lot of time with and we often play boardgames together and as long as the kids are small, we like to be out geocaching or chasing Pokémons, but sometimes I force them to a cultural event instead.

Do you have any book tips you want to share?
I have a lot! but I’ll settle with three: Sara Lövestam’s books about the paperless private detective Kouplan provide insight into a whole different life than many of us live today, start with Sanning med modifikation (only available in Swedish). A dramatic and intense novel of my taste is Butcher’s Crossing by John Williams. It is about hunting buffalo but equally about the pursuit of your self. If you instead feel like having a funny reading experience, you have to read Christer Lundberg’s Bläckfisken (only available in Swedish). A tall tale that takes place in Gothenburg and in its madness gives many good laughs.

Text: Tandis Talay & Lena Holmberg
Foto: Tandis Talay

Let the databases help out with referencing

Most student essays and theses require correct referencing, this means that you need to place references to your sources both in the text and in a bibliography or a reference list at the end of your document. The references are sorted in alphabetical order and should contain sufficient information for your readers to easily find the documents you have used in your work.

There are automatic functions available in various search engines to automatically extract citations for a bibliography. Here are some examples:

Primo – www.hb.se/library
The library’s new discovery tool. Here you will find references to our print book collection as well as lots of e-books and articles.

Libris – libris.kb.se
Sweden’s national library catalog. Here you can find books, dissertations, reports and more available at Swedish libraries.

Google Scholar – scholar.google.com 
Here you can do a broad search for scientific literature. You also can find student papers, theses, books, abstracts and articles, from universities and academic publishers here. Note, however, that everything in Google Scholar is not “scientific” but there are still different in content and functions other than the search engine Google.

Adjustments necessary
Please note that the  formatting and content can vary between different search engines – therefore, always make sure that all references in your source list has a consistent look and conforms to your preferred style.

Reference to a book:
Eklund, K. (2007). Our economy: An introduction to the national economy. 11. Edition, Stockholm: Norstedts..

Reference to a journal article:
Elmqvist, C., Brown, D., Fridlund, B., & Ekebergh, M. (2010). Being first on the scene of an accident – experiences of ‘doing’ prehospital emergency care. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, 24 (2), ss. 266-273.

Text: Sara Hellberg
Picture: Colourbox

Time for this year’s Debutant prize!

It´s finally time for Borås Tidning debutant prize to be awarded. It is an annual prize and it is especially exciting for us because it’s happening here in Borås, in cooperation with the University. The awards ceremony takes place on Thursday evening at Borås City Theatre’s main stage where “Lilla Debutant priset” (Little Debutant prize) also is awarded. All these books are written in swedish so if you want to practice the language you have a great opportunity to do so.

If you want to know more about the authors, please read what some of Sweden’s literary critics think about this year’s debutantes. (only in swedish) This year it stands between  För vad sorg och smärta byThom Lundberg, Skuggan by Marit Furns, Tripprapporter by Tone Schunnesson, och vi fortsatte att göra någonting rörande by Elis Burrau and Storm i den pelare som bär by Andreas Lundberg. This year it is one poetry collection and four novels that participates. Associated with this price we are displaying these books at the information desk in the library, welcome to borrow!

Text: Lena Holmberg
Picture: Book covers from www.adlibris.com

Printing – here’s how you do it!

Do you need to print a document, but you’re not sure how to do it? Then this is what you need to read! This instruction explains how you print from the computers at the university. If you want to print a document from your laptop – please contact the Information Point at the entrance to the Library.

At the computer

The most important part when you’re about to print, is to select the right printer. And that’s not very hard – you should ALWAYS select the printer called Print-and-Collect.

How the printing dialog (the frame where you manage your prints) looks depends on which program you are printing from. Here are two examples, the print dialog in Microsoft Word and in Adobe Acrobat (program for pdf-files):

utskriftutskrift2Click on the pictures if you want to see them better!

 

Make sure that the right printer is selected, that’s Print-and-Collect (it is usually right, so you probably do not need to change) – then you click at the button Print (in Swedish Skriv ut). Done!

At the printer

Okay, so far so good. The document has been printed. Now what? Where do you go to get it? The thing is that you can now go to any printer – at the whole university – at the printer you get your printed document. At the Library, we have printers on each floor (except floor 2.5). The printers are quite big, and looks like copying machines (in fact, they are coping machines as well as printers and scanners). When you found a printer, here’s what you do:

  1. Log in to the printer, using your black chip or your S-number and password.
  2. Select Release by pressing this “button” on the touch screen.
  3. Select the document you want to print by pointing at it at the touch screen. The document will be marked with a yellow line when you’ve selected it.
  4. Press the blue button (it’s a real button – not on the touch screen).
  5. Voila! You document is printed!

If your document won’t print, it might depend on that you don’t have enough printing credentials left on your printing account. Contact the Information Point for directions on how to refill your printing account. When you have done that, you just return to the printer, and get you document (no need to print from the computer again).

If you have any questions – please contact the Information Point by the entrance to the Library. We can help you to print!

Text & pictures: Katharina Nordling

Do you have questions about how to find your textbooks?

Are you wondering about textbooks? In this blog post we show you how to find the right textbook on the shelf and give you some useful tip on other ways beside the library to get hold of the popular books.

The Library buys at least two copies of each book. One loan and one course reference book. The later is a reference copy, which can´t leave the library it can only be used in the building. You find all course reference books at the 1st floor at the library and they are sorted in alphabetical order with a yellow sticker on the back. It appears clearly in the library catalog through Summon.

Take the book you want to read in the library or copy a chapter or two, and then put it back on a trolley so the next person can get access to the book. The copy you can borrow is for loan for two weeks and you can renew the book if no one else waits for it, otherwise it must be returned. This because as many people as possible should be able to read them during the course. A textbook can also be found as an e-book and can be read both here at the university and from home, it is your computer login that you use to login with. All textbooks are included in the library catalog and have two placements, it can look like this for example:

The top copy is the course reference book that you find on the 1st floor and the lower is the lending copy that you find placed on the subject out in the library. The course reference book may not always be in place at the 1st floor because someone else might be reading it. Come back later and look for it again

But why can´t we have class sets of everything? Because we do not have the opportunity for a variety of reasons. First, we have no place for it, the library must accommodate a lot of other literature and other things than textbooks. Second, we can not afford it, the library has a media budget to follow each year and it is within its framework we purchase textbooks. We must also ensure that our book collection contains relevant books that can be used in essay writing and other school work.

If you want to buy your textbooks the Student Bookstore at Allégatan is a good choice, they have almost all of the university course books at good prices. Online bookshops as Adlibris and Bokus often have a wide range of literature. you can also often find advertisements for sale of used textbooks on the university notice boards, and on the sites kurslitteratur.se and bokbörsen, you can search for used books. Sometimes the Student Union arranges a book fair or book swap at the university.

Text & picture: Lena Holmberg