Hi Klaz Arvidson!

In a series of portraits we are going to introduce the staff at the Library to all our readers and customers – who are the people working at the library? And what are they doing there? Read our portraits and get to know your librarians! We asked Lena a few questions.

What are your main duties?
I’m part of the unit Digital Services that works with library systems and research support. I work mainly with Primo, support systems and parts of the library’s website. I’m in team Communication and team Alma and Primo. In addition, I work at the information point where I answer questions and support students, staff and other users in their library usage.

For how long have you worked here?
Oh, it’s been quite long! For further reflection, I’m in my 18th year at the library. My first task when I started here was to take a new grip on the library’s web. Over the years my tasks have changed slightly, but I’ve always been involved in working with web and systems and contacts with library users.

What do you enjoy most about the job?
The funniest thing about the job is two things I think – problem solving and the contacts with our students and staff. At the information point you can be prepared for many different kinds of questions and it is exciting and rewarding. Over the past year, we have implemented two new library systems, Alma and Primo, which has been stimulating and challenging.

What do you do when you’re not at work?
Outside the job, I spend a lot of time with my family. We have an old house that requires some maintenance which takes a lot of my time. Otherwise, I like to photograph, move in nature and kayak. Longing for the year’s first kayaking trip, it will be a sunny day in April when the ice is released!

Do you have any book tips you want to share?
I read a bit in periods, some time ago I read the books Gentlemen and Gangsters by Klas Östergren. Particularly Gentlemen, I can recommend it’s a writer’s meeting with two strange brothers. Their lives are presented and  many interesting developments are described in detail. Another book I recommend is Norrland by Po Tidholm. It consists of a number of essays and reports about the geographical part of Sweden, which is a bit sloppy called Norrland.

Text: Klaz Arvidson & Lena Holmberg
Photo: Lena Holmberg

Get to know Scopus

Scopus is a citation database from Elsevier that indexes articles from over 22 000 scientific journals and contains more than 69 million records. Across all research fields:

  • Mathematics
  • Engineering
  • Technology
  • Social sciences
  • Arts and humanities
  • Health and medicine

Scopus content also patents, books and conference proceedings.

How can I use Scopus?

As usual, you access specific databases from the Library webbsite for databases at www.hb.se/biblioteket. There are introductory films that will help you get started using the various features quickly:

The focus is on scientific publications such as journal articles and conference paper. A specialty is the ability to follow how the publications are used through citations and reference lists. In the database you also have the opportunity to compare how different journals rank against each other.

The occurrence of nouns varies greatly. The database does not have its own subject list / thesaurus, but reports topics from the different databases from which the items originate. An article may have nouns from different databases.

Scopus also has very good features if you want to analyze its search results. It’s also great to search only in the references when searching. Then you put it in search, so you can search for those who have referred to a certain book that are not in the database but can still be found in the references.

The database has a search history, which is good because you can then combine your searches in different ways without rewriting the search terms. The search history is saved from the login time. You can of course log in to the database and save searches, hits lists, etc.

Text: Lena Wadell

The book donation by Larsh Eriksson in place

Last year, the library received a donation of a large collection of books in areas such as textiles, fashion and management. The gift came from Larsh Eriksson, teacher of design management at The Swedish School of Textiles for many years. Larsh had a special interest in collecting books on the subject and wanted to donate his collection to the library. After a review at the home of Larsh, about 50 moving boxes came with books to the library and were unpacked in the following year.

Everything has been reviewed and most of the books have been cataloged and moved into the library collections. The last books where placed on shelves by the end of 2017.

The books are now available for lending and may be of great interest for students at The Swedish School of Textiles, but also for other persons. There are many beautiful books in art, fashion, design, decor that can attract everyone. All books are now part of the library’s collection and are searchable in Primo. If you want to know more, please contact Martin Borg here at the library, or else – welcome here to borrow! 

Read more about Larsh Eriksson and the book collection at the university website and in Borås Tidning.

Text & image: Lena Holmberg

Reservation for book in Primo – here’s how it works

If you have been searching for a book in Primo and it turns out to be on loan (and you don’t need the book the same day), you might want to make a reservation for the book. Now you can easily make reservations on your own in Primo; here is a brief description of how it works:

1. Search for the book in Primo on the Library web page. When you locate the book in the hit list – click on the book title.

2. Log in to the system with your UB-account.

3. Click the Request link. It will only be available if all copies of the book are on loan. If there are copies available in the Library, the link will not be there (because it is not possible to reserve books when there are copies available for loan).

4. Click the Request button. If you want, you can change the date for how long the request will be active (an opportunity if you know that if you don’t get the book before a certain date, you don’t need the book at all).

5. Once you’ve clicked Request you will get a notification that the request was activated. If you don’t get this notification – please contact the Information Point.

6. As soon as the book is available for you we will place it on the shelf for reserved books. It will be placed alphabetically by your last name.

7. Now you’ll receive an e-mail notifying you that the book is waiting for you at the library. The book will be on the shelf, waiting for you for three days, the last pickup date will be specified in the e-mail we sent you.

8. Once you found the book, you borrow it in the machines next to the entrance as usual.

Notice: You cannot make a request for a book that you’ve already borrowed, or a book that you already have an active request for. Or a request books that are available on shelf.

Text & picture: Katharina Nordling

Printing – here’s how you do it!

Do you need to print a document, but you’re not sure how to do it? Then this is what you need to read! This instruction explains how you print from the computers at the university. If you want to print a document from your laptop – please contact the Information Point at the entrance to the Library.

At the computer

The most important part when you’re about to print, is to select the right printer. And that’s not very hard – you should ALWAYS select the printer called Print-and-Collect.

How the printing dialog (the frame where you manage your prints) looks depends on which program you are printing from. Here are two examples, the print dialog in Microsoft Word and in Adobe Acrobat (program for pdf-files):

utskriftutskrift2Click on the pictures if you want to see them better!


Make sure that the right printer is selected, that’s Print-and-Collect– then you click at the button Print (in Swedish Skriv ut). Done!

At the printer

Okay, so far so good. The document has been printed. Now what? Where do you go to get it? The thing is that you can now go to any printer – at the whole university – at the printer you get your printed document. At the Library, we have printers on each floor (except floor 2.5). The printers are quite big, and looks like copying machines (in fact, they are coping machines as well as printers and scanners). When you found a printer, here’s what you do:

  1. Log in to the printer, using your black chip or your S-number and password.
  2. Select Release by pressing this “button” on the touch screen.
  3. Select the document you want to print by pointing at it at the touch screen. The document will be marked with a yellow line when you’ve selected it.
  4. Press the blue button (it’s a real button – not on the touch screen).
  5. Voila! You document is printed!

If your document won’t print, it might depend on that you don’t have enough printing credentials left on your printing account. Contact the Information Point for directions on how to refill your printing account. When you have done that, you just return to the printer, and get you document (no need to print from the computer again).

If you print a large document on many pages (such as an essay) or a Powerpoint with images, it may take a while for the document to print.

If you have any questions – please contact the Information Point by the entrance to the Library. We can help you to print!

Text & pictures: Katharina Nordling

Welcome to a new semester!

Welcome all of you new and old students and researchers!

It’s time for a new semester and today is the first day, and for many of you this a familiar environment you come back to – but for some of you the University of Borås is a whole new experience. Maybe new accommodation, new city, new student buddies and new courses. Here on the Library blog we want to give you a few tips that can help you, new or old student, regarding library services:

  • Library opening hours are displayed on the website.
  • A reference copy of all required textbooks are available on the 1st floor – these books can not be borrowed and are only for use in the library.
  • All textbooks for loan stands on each subjectshelf in the library. Many textbooks are also available as e-books.
  • Most of our materials can be found by searching in Primo (our discovery tool). You find the searchbox on our website.
  • Your tag is your library card and also a copy / print card.
  • Photocopying is mainly available the 1st floor.
  • Multifunction printers are available on all floors (except 2.5). Instructions for printing can be found here.
  • The library has many study rooms – you book the rooms through Kronox.
  • All books in the library are in numerical order – from 000 on level 2.5 to 999 on the 4th floor.
  • The library has printed journals on level 1 but also on level 2. But the majority of our journals are electronic, and you can find them through the website.
  • Adjust the sound level to a normal conversational tone, this is a place of work for many people. A good idea is to put your phone in silent mode.
  • There is a quiet study room in the library, you find it at the entrance floor.
  • Keep in mind that you’re not allowed to eat in the library. Drinks with lids, fruit and candy are OK; but for eating – please visit the café or the lounge with microwave ovens outside the library.
  • If you need help with information seeking just come ask the librarian at the Information point, we will gladly help you.
  • The Library Search lab has drop-in hours if you need further help with your information seeking. In addition, the Language lab is open at the same time in the same room, so you can also get help with linguistic questions.
  • If you have questions about your user account, problems with Microsoft Word or other questions, please feel free to contact us.

If you are a new student – please read more on our website with helpful information for you as a new student. P.S. Feel free to follow us in social media!

Text: Lena Holmberg
Photo: Suss Wilén

How can I find the book in the library?

Do you think it’s tricky to find books in the library? We have a great guide on the web that you can look at, and then you know how you should proceed.

All libraries are structured in a specific way in order to make it possible to find books. To find a book in any library: Always start by searching.

In our library you use Primo at the library’s website to find the exact shelf placement for the book. By searching Primo you will also see directly if the book is at the shelf or not.
Here we see that the book should be found on floor 1 at the course book shelf where all books are not for loan. There are all the books sorted alphabetically. But this book is also for loan at another shelf on the 4th floor at shelf 808.066 Once you are at the right shelf, the books are arranged in alphabetical order, usually by author but sometimes the title. Therefore it is important to always search for the book on the web first, before you go up on the shelf. How is the book placed within the shelf? In this case, on the title.

Hopefully you have now found the book and can borrow it!

A few years ago our library left the Swedish SAB system which divided different subjects using letter combinations. We then introduced the US classification system Dewey Decimal Classification (DDC), which is based on numbers. This meant relocating virtually all the books in the entire library. It was a pretty demanding job, both physically and for our library system but all went well and today DDC is the system we use (with some exceptions such as fiction and older literature on the first floor).

Text and photo: Lena Holmberg