Automatic renewals – here’s how it works!

When you borrow a book at the library, the loan will be automatically renewed if it’s possible – here’s a description of how the procedure works.

An automatic renewal is a renewal that’s made by the system. No one has to do anything, nor you or a librarian. However the system is stopped from doing a renewal of the loan if someone else has made a request for the book, or if the loan period has reached the maximum limit.

It all works like this:

You borrow a book at the Library; the loan period is either 7 or 21 days (depending on if it’s a course book or another book). When it’s two days left of the loan period the systems checks to see if it’s possible to renew the loan, then one of the following scenarios happen:

  1. No one has made a request for the book – the loan is renewed and you get a new loan period for 7 or 21 days (depending on if it’s a course book or another book).
  2. The loan cannot be renewed; you will be notified by e-mail and the original due date remains.

If scenario 1 happens, the same procedure will repeat two days before the new loan period ends.

In practice this means that you can keep the book until you get notified by e-mail that it’s time to return the book. But if you are going to use that practice – you need to check your e-mail address regularly, because in the end it’s you who are responsible of returning your books on time.

Text & Picture: Katharina Nordling

Click your way to more information about the book you want to borrow

Are you looking for a book in Primo to find out if it’s available to borrow at the library, then it’s worth clicking a few times past the results list, then you can clearly see if the book is available or not.

Let’s take an example and search for the book Business research methods.

In the result list we get the following information:This means that there are one item of the book available among the course books at floor 1 (the course books you can’t bring outside the library). But it also says that there are items available at other locations. We get more information about these items if we click either the title of the book or the information about location.

Here is again information that the book is available among the course books that are not available for lending (Floor 1 Course Books Reference), but there’s also information that there are two copies of the book at floor 3 in the library. We can also see that none of them are available. But you can click this post as well.

We’ll click the link to the copies located at floor 3 and get information about each copy of the book. One of them are waiting to be picked up since it’s been requested by someone, and the other one is actually overdue – so it should be back any day.

So the more you click – the more information you get.

Text & picture: Katharina Nordling

Reservation for book in Primo – here’s how it works

If you have been searching for a book in Primo and it turns out to be on loan (and you don’t need the book the same day), you might want to make a reservation for the book. Now you can easily make reservations on your own in Primo; here is a brief description of how it works:

1. Search for the book in Primo on the Library web page. When you locate the book in the hit list – click on the book title.

2. Log in to the system with your UB-account.

3. Click the Request link. It will only be available if all copies of the book are on loan. If there are copies available in the Library, the link will not be there (because it is not possible to reserve books when there are copies available for loan).

4. Click the Request button. If you want, you can change the date for how long the request will be active (an opportunity if you know that if you don’t get the book before a certain date, you don’t need the book at all).

5. Once you’ve clicked Request you will get a notification that the request was activated. If you don’t get this notification – please contact the Information Point.

6. As soon as the book is available for you we will place it on the shelf for reserved books. It will be placed alphabetically by your last name.

7. Now you’ll receive an e-mail notifying you that the book is waiting for you at the library. The book will be on the shelf, waiting for you for three days, the last pickup date will be specified in the e-mail we sent you.

8. Once you found the book, you borrow it in the machines next to the entrance as usual.


Notice: You cannot make a request for a book that you’ve already borrowed, or a book that you already have an active request for. Or a request books that are available on shelf.

Text & picture: Katharina Nordling

How can I find the book in the library?

Do you think it’s tricky to find books in the library? We have a great guide on the web that you can look at, and then you know how you should proceed.

All libraries are structured in a specific way in order to make it possible to find books. To find a book in any library: Always start by searching.

In our library you use Primo at the library’s website to find the exact shelf placement for the book. By searching Primo you will also see directly if the book is at the shelf or not.
Here we see that the book should be found on floor 1 at the course book shelf where all books are not for loan. There are all the books sorted alphabetically. But this book is also for loan at another shelf on the 4th floor at shelf 808.066 Once you are at the right shelf, the books are arranged in alphabetical order, usually by author but sometimes the title. Therefore it is important to always search for the book on the web first, before you go up on the shelf. How is the book placed within the shelf? In this case, on the title.

Hopefully you have now found the book and can borrow it!

A few years ago our library left the Swedish SAB system which divided different subjects using letter combinations. We then introduced the US classification system Dewey Decimal Classification (DDC), which is based on numbers. This meant relocating virtually all the books in the entire library. It was a pretty demanding job, both physically and for our library system but all went well and today DDC is the system we use (with some exceptions such as fiction and older literature on the first floor).

Text and photo: Lena Holmberg

Here’s how it works: Returning books

How it works: In a series of blog posts we try to make the library more understandable to our users. What’s happening in the library? What is the purpose of different machines? What rules are there and why? Read and get some explanations and tips regarding the library!

The foundation of the whole idea of Library is to borrow the books, nowadays libraries do (and are) a lot of other things as well, but to borrow books to people is often seen as the library core. The term borrowing something implies that you also need to return the same something: A borrowed book must be returned. In recent years, the management of this aterlamning(returning books) are increasingly taken over by machines. Today we’re going show you the library’s automated book return machine.

At the outside of the library (but inside the university building) is a green treadmill sticking out from a hole in the wall. This is the public part of the automated book return machine. This is where you return your borrowed book. You place the book on the treadmill and the book disappears into the wall. But what happens then? The following film is shot while standing opposite the position where you return the book:

The book continues on the treadmill, and is then sorted into one of five carriages depending on which floor the book should be located on. Which of the five carriages that is right for your book is decided by information about the books location in the library, stored in a chip inside the book. The initial sort is only a rough sorting, the staff at the library sorts each of the carriages more thoroughly, before the books are placed on the right shelf in the library again.

One of sorting carriages is for books that there’s a “problem” with. Books that are returned way passed the due date of the loan, or books that are reserved by someone else. These books require manual intervention and are always handled by staff at the library.

The automated book return machine also activates the alarm on all returned (the alarm is deactivated when you borrow a book).

The automated book return machine at our library is quite small, it only has five differens sorting carriages. At other, bigger libraries the machines can have many more sorting possibilities – for example: Check out this film from Boulder Public Library that has a rather big sorting machine.

Text, picture and movie: Katharina Nordling

How it works: Books not available in the library

How it works: In a series of blog posts we try to make the library more understandable to our users. What’s happening in the library? What is the purpose of different machines? What rules are there and why? Read and get some explanations and tips regarding the library!

At the library we have a lot of books, but there are of course books that we don’t have as well. However, the fact that we don’t have a particular book shouldn’t prevent you from reading it. If you need a book we don’t have – we will do our best to get hold of that book for you.

There are two different ways in which we obtain books, the first option we have is to buy the book. If we choose to buy a book, we order it from one of our suppliers, and as soon as the book has arrived and is ready to be lent to you, we’ll send you an e-mail. The format of the book (e-book/printed) depends on whats available. If we buy a printed book you will find the book at the shelf for reserved books in the library. When you are done with the book, you return it and the book will be a part of our collections – ready to be user by another student or teacher.

The second option for us to obtain a book is to make an interlibrary loan. This means that we will borrow the book from another library, and then we lend the book to you. So you will borrow another library’s book, but you do it through us. We order the book from another library, they send us the book, and as soon as the book arrives we’ll send you an e-mail notifying you that the book is waiting for you. When you come to the library to get the book, you’ll find it at the Information Point at the entrance. After you are done with the book, you return it to us, and we send the book back to the other library. If someone else would like to borrow the book at another time, we need to borrow it again.

So what is it that determines which of the above options we choose to get the book for you? In fact there are a number of factors that play into the selection, for example: Is the book new? Is the book’s subject relevant to any of the university disciplines? If the answer is YES to one of these questions it increases the likelihood that we buy the book. If we however believe that it is likely that you are the only one interested in this book, or if the book is old and impossible to buy, we choose to make an interlibrary loan.

Our goal is for you to get access to the books you need whether we actually have the book or not. Therefore it is always worth contacting us if you need a book we do not have, we promise to do our best to find the book for you.

Text: Katharina Nordling
Picture: Mostphotos

Automatic renewals – here’s how it works!

When you borrow a book at the library, the loan will be automatically renewed if it’s possible – here’s a description of how the procedure works.

An automatic renewal is a renewal that’s made by the system. No one has to do anything, nor you or a librarian. However the system is stopped from doing a renewal of the loan if someone else has made a request for the book, or if the loan period has reached the maximum limit.

It all works like this:

You borrow a book at the Library; the loan period is either 7 or 21 days (depending on if it’s a course book or another book). When it’s two days left of the loan period the systems checks to see if it’s possible to renew the loan, then one of the following scenarios happen:

  1. No one has made a request for the book – the loan is renewed and you get a new loan period for 7 or 21 days (depending on if it’s a course book or another book).
  2. The loan cannot be renewed; you will be notified by e-mail and the original due date remains.

If scenario 1 happens, the same procedure will repeat two days before the new loan period ends.

In practice this means that you can keep the book until you get notified by e-mail that it’s time to return the book. But if you are going to use that practice – you need to check your e-mail address regularly, because in the end it’s you who are responsible of returning your books on time.

Text & Picture: Katharina Nordling