Automatic renewals – here’s how it works!

When you borrow a book at the library, the loan will be automatically renewed if it’s possible – here’s a description of how the procedure works.

An automatic renewal is a renewal that’s made by the system. No one has to do anything, nor you or a librarian. However the system is stopped from doing a renewal of the loan if someone else has made a request for the book, or if the loan period has reached the maximum limit.

It all works like this:

You borrow a book at the Library; the loan period is either 7 or 21 days (depending on if it’s a course book or another book). When it’s two days left of the loan period the systems checks to see if it’s possible to renew the loan, then one of the following scenarios happen:

  1. No one has made a request for the book – the loan is renewed and you get a new loan period for 7 or 21 days (depending on if it’s a course book or another book).
  2. The loan cannot be renewed; you will be notified by e-mail and the original due date remains.

If scenario 1 happens, the same procedure will repeat two days before the new loan period ends.

In practice this means that you can keep the book until you get notified by e-mail that it’s time to return the book. But if you are going to use that practice – you need to check your e-mail address regularly, because in the end it’s you who are responsible of returning your books on time.

Text & Picture: Katharina Nordling

Reservation for book in Primo – here’s how it works

If you have been searching for a book in Primo and it turns out to be on loan (and you don’t need the book the same day), you might want to make a reservation for the book. Now you can easily make reservations on your own in Primo; here is a brief description of how it works:

1. Search for the book in Primo on the Library web page. When you locate the book in the hit list – click on the book title.

2. Log in to the system with your UB-account.

3. Click the Request link. It will only be available if all copies of the book are on loan. If there are copies available in the Library, the link will not be there (because it is not possible to reserve books when there are copies available for loan).

4. Click the Request button. If you want to, you can change the date for how long the request will be active (an opportunity if you know that if you don’t get the book before a certain date, you don’t need the book at all).

5. Once you’ve clicked Request you will get a notification that the request was activated. If you don’t get this notification – please contact the Information Point.

6. As soon as the book is available for you we place it on the shelf for reserved books. It will be placed alphabetically by your last name.

7. Now you’ll receive an e-mail notifying you that the book is waiting for you at the library. The book will be on the shelf, waiting for you for five days, the last pickup date will be specified in the e-mail we sent you.

8. Once you found the book, you borrow it in the machines next to the entrance as usual.


Notice: You cannot make a request for a book that you’ve already borrowed, or a book that you already have an active request for.

Text & picture: Katharina Nordling

Automatic renewals – here’s how it works!

Automatic renewals are one of the things included in the Library’s new borrowing regulations, which take effect Friday 31 March; here is a brief description of how automatic renewals work.

An automatic renewal is a renewal that’s made by the system. No one has to do anything, nor you or a librarian. However the system is stopped from doing a renewal of the loan if someone else has made a request for the book.

It all works like this:

You borrow a book at the Library; the loan period is either 7 or 21 days (depending on if it’s a course book or another book). When it’s two days left of the loan period the systems checks to see if it’s possible to renew the loan, then one of the following scenarios happen:

  1. No one has made a request for the book – the loan is renewed and you get a new loan period for 7 or 21 days (depending on if it’s a course book or another book).
  2. The loan cannot be renewed; you will be notified by e-mail and the original due date remains.

If scenario 1 happens, the same procedure will repeat two days before the new loan period ends.

In practice this means that you can keep the book until you get notified by e-mail that it’s time to return the book. But if you are going to use that practice – you need to check your e-mail address regularly, because in the end it’s you who are responsible of returning your books on time.

Text & Picture: Katharina Nordling

Climate fiction – a highly topical genre

Climate fiction is a growing literary genre that developed out of the threat we know from today’s climate change. A sort of realistic science fiction with disaster elements. The concept was given back in 2007 but no genre has not broke through for real before it had a catchy acronym and a few years ago it finally came – “Cli-Fi”!

It’s about fiction that somehow reflects today’s global warming and give us an interpretation of how our future would look like. Can this literature affect our view on climate change? Maybe we feel more engaged when we skip the scientific talk and are thrown straight into a literary act that could be about ourselves?

Cli-Fi does not give us all the answers but a range of potential future scenarios to consider, it evokes emotion. What happens for example, if that part of the country where I live is flooded, forcing me to move or find other ways to live. Where the living conditions and the rules of the game suddenly change? This highly topical subject attracting different types of readers and is also grateful for cinema. The concept of Cli-Fi is up & coming and hopefully we will soon be able to read more Swedish authors in the genre.

dsc_0023Please read the interview with Dan Bloom, who invented the term and who created the web The Cli-Fi Report (CFR).

If you want to read some Cli-fi novels published in recent years and maybe even some older that also qualify in the field, we have some tips. Some are available in the library:

Meg Little Reilly We Are Unprepared (2016)
Paolo Bacigalupi The water knife (2015)
Camilla Sten En annan gryning (2015)
Kim Stanley Robinson Green Earth (2015) The shortened processing trilogy of Science in the capital consisting of Forty signs of rain (2004), Fifty degrees below (2005) and Sixty days and counting (2007).
Catarina Rolfsdotter Jansson Malmö Manhattan 1994 2024 (2014)
Monica Byrnes The girl in the road (2014)
Margaret Atwood MaddAddam-trilogy with Oryx and Crake (2003),The Year of the Flood (2010) and MaddAddam (2013)
Jesper Weithz Det som inte växer är döende (2012) E-bok
Emmi Itäranta Teemestarin kirja (2012) in english Memory of water
Barbara Kingsolver Flight behavior (2012)
Ian McEwan Solar (2010)
Maggie Gee The Ice People (1998)

Text & picture: Lena Holmberg

Request a book – here’s how it works

Sometimes the book you need from the library is already on loan, but if you don’t need the book immediately, and you can wait until the person who has borrowed the book has returned it, you can make a request for the book. A request is easily done on your own, and here is a brief description of how you do it:

1. Search for the book in Summon on the Library web page. When you locate the book in the hit list – click on the book title. reservation_summon_eng  2. When you’re at the page with more information about the book, make sure no copy is available in the library – then click the link Make a Request.

reservation_post_eng3. Log in to the system with your UB account.

4. Activate the request by clicking Submit. If you want to, you can change the date for how long the request will be active (an option if you know that if you don’t get the book before a certain date, you don’t need the book at all).

reservationer_reservationen_eng5. Once you’ve clicked Submit you will get a notification that the request was activated properly. If you don’t get this notification – please contact the Information Point.

reservationer_reservationen_gjord_eng6. As soon as the book is available for you we place it on the shelf for reserved books. It will be placed alphabetically by your last name.IMG_32457. Now you’ll receive an e-mail notifying you that the book is waiting for you at the library. The book will be on the shelf, waiting for you for five days, the last pickup date will be specified in the e-mail we sent you.

8. Once you found the book, you borrow it in the machines next to the entrance as usual.


Notice: You cannot make a request for a book that you’ve already borrowed, or a book that you already have an active request for. And if you make a request when there’s a copy of the book available on the shelf – you will just end up in line for the books that are already on loan. So in that case it’s better for you to just come to the library and borrow the copy that’s available.

Text & picture: Katharina Nordling

Dictionaries and Encyclopaedias

dicThe library has many dictionaries and encyclopedias but most of them are not for lending. Why is it so? Dictionaries and encyclopedias are a help in your studies and are needed in the library for looking up a word and get its meaning or translation.

Today, many of the dictionaries and encyclopedias are freely available on the web and the library also has some paid subscriptions. Before it was almost never possible to borrow dictionaries and encyclopedias but today we have a few of Norstedts English-Swedish dictionary for loan (located at floor 3, shelf 423) and we often make older editions for loan, while the newest one get to be REF – and stay in the library. Please visit the library’s databases and see what kind dictionaries and encyclopedias we have for help online!

Text: Lena Holmberg
Picture: Tandis Talay

Distance student?

Right now, many interlibrary loan requests from you distance students come in to the library, but actually many of those requests doesn’t belong among interlibrary loans. So here is a brief explanation of the difference:

distance student is a person registered as a student at one of the University’s distance programs, and another requirement is that you don’t live in Borås (033 Area).

An interlibrary loan is material (eg a book or article) that we ourselves do not have in the library and therefore must borrow from other libraries. (We do not lend the material that we have in the collections but is on loan at the moment)

As a distance student, you can get books and journal articles sent home who are in the library’s physical collections. You fill in a special form when you order home materials as a distance student. Do not use our form for interlibrary loan, then the order takes much longer, because it end up in the wrong department.

From home, you can access most of the databases the library has subscriptions to and our e-book providers, log in with your regular user/password (same as the PINGPONG). So always start by searching in Summon to see if we have the materials your’e looking for in e-format.

The above description about distance students should not be confused with the interlibrary loan from another library when what you want is not among our collections. For an interlibrary loan price can vary between 40 and 80 SEK / article depending on where in the world it can be ordered from.

As a distance student getting books sent home is free but you pay yourself for the shipping back to us. Getting journal articles copied and sent home is priced from 40 SEK / article. We do not copy material from books that are available for loan in our collections.

Learn more about the services to you as a distance student on our website.

 

Text: Lisa Carlson