Hi Signe Wulund!

In a series of portraits we are going to introduce the staff at the Library to all our readers and customers. Who are the people working at the library? And what are they doing there? Read our portraits and get to know your librarians! We asked Lena a few questions.

 

What are your main duties?

Since about 6 weeks ago I work with research support in the Digital Services function. This means that I (when I get a bit more experience) will be the person to help and inform researchers, PhD students and administrators about issues regarding for example the publication database DiVA, Open Access and research data management. I’ll naturally also be available at the InformationPoint and do a lot of other things behind the scenes – it’s going to be exciting to see exactly what my roles develops into eventually.

What where you doing before you started working here?

That’s a good question. I’ve done a lot of random stuff! The last five years I’ve been living in Cambridge where I had a research support role at the University. Before that I was a children’s librarian at the fantastic public library in Nynäshamn south of Stockholm. I arrived there from Japan, where I among other experiences managed to study Japanese and teach Naval English at a coast guard headquarter. I did my Masters in Library and Information Science at Uppsala University, and they had an exchange program through which I ended up in Japan the first time.

What do you do when you’re not at work?

Right now I’m furnishing a brand new rental apartment, and trying to get to know Borås. I’m completely new here, and I came from England with two suitcases and nothing else. We have boxes of books (and other stuff too) coming eventually, but as we had rented a furnished place in Cambridge there’s a lot of IKEA and running around Knalleland going on right now. I really miss hanging out in the couch with my wife and our two cats, but fortunately they are also moving here to Borås from England in the beginning of December. And I look forward to getting back out in the Swedish nature!

What made you apply to the library at the University of Borås?

I had set up a notification for jobs in Sweden with keywords like “open access”, and when I saw that the University of Borås was looking for a digital services librarian it felt like an amazing chance. After all, this is the heart of Swedish library studies, and I couldn’t imagine a better combination than a work place where I could use the specialist knowledge I’d gained at the University of Cambridge and at the same time learn a lot of new things in the field. And that proved true the very first day, when I got to listen in on a lecture to Library and Information Science students some of my colleagues gave.

Did you know from the beginning that you wanted to work with researchers and publications?

Not at all – this has really happened by pure chance! I started as a temp in Cambridge, and pretty early I ended up in various administrative departments where I helped out with exactly research support and publications. I quickly became involved in questions regarding the open access of publication and research data, and that’s how I ended up here. I feel that it’s a very exciting area that is also developing extremely rapidly, at the same time as it’s important for libraries and higher education institutions to keep up and communicate everything it means to those who are directly affected by the relevant requirements and policies.

Do you have any book tips you want to share?

I like everything from NK Jemisin, but the just-completed broken Earth trilogy is probably the best she’s written so far. It is crude and majestic fantasy in the borderland to SF where she confronts many difficult questions. No wonder that the first two parts won each Hugo. Yoon Ha Lee has so far two books out in the series Machineries of the Empire, where the first part was so good that I read it again after six months just to get to experience it again. He writes SF that feels like watching a colourful animated film. Ada Palmer won the John W. Campbell Award in the category of Best newcomer with her future vision Too like the lightning, which I can really understand-. It also doesn’t resemble anything I’ve read before. I’m now waiting tense for her The will to Battle that’s coming out in December.

Text: Tandis Talay and Signe Wulund
Picture: Tandis Talay

Hi Lena Svenson!

In a series of portraits we are going to introduce the staff at the Library to all our readers and customers. Who are the people working at the library? And what are they doing there? Read our portraits and get to know your staff! We asked Lena a few questions.

Bild på Lena SvenssonWhat are your main duties?
I work at the Department Collection Services here at the library, and I would say I have three main tasks. I help students who, for various reasons, are in need of recorded literature. I also work with Interlibrary Loans, i.e. I send books and articles to other libraries. Furthermore, I help our distance students to get the material they need sent home from the Library.
Since it is the European Dyslexia Week this week I would like to pay attention to the help offered here at the university. If you feel that you have a reading disability, you have the right to have your literature recorded.

For how long have you worked here?
The University has been my employer since in 1989. I worked at the Financial Department for a few years before coming to the Library in 1992. For 27 years I have been working in three different library systems and if I have calculated correctly, my current Library Director is the sixth in order.

What do you do when you’re not at work?
I like to cook and have dinner with good friends. Training, creative activities, travel, Wordfeud, Sudoku and reading are examples of what I would like to do when all other household work is done.

Do you have any book tips you want to share with us?
Elakt spel by Jan Mårtensson is a really good detective story. To get a little different perspective on life, I can recommend Armlös, benlös men inte hopplös by Mikael Andersson. For me, Linda Olsson’s Nu vill jag sjunga dig milda sånger really challanged my patience. I had to start over a few times before I coluld read it. Now, I like it very much! Linda’s style of writing is a bit special, I think.

What do you like most about your job?
To meet all wonderful  people and to search for articles.

Text: Christel Olsson & Lena Svenson
Photo: Klaz Arvidson

 

Hi Lena Holmberg!

In a series of portraits we are going to introduce the staff at the Library to all our readers and customers. Who are the people working at the library? And what are they doing there? Read our portraits and get to know your librarians! We asked Lena a few questions.

How long have you been working here?
I celebrated ten years as an employee in 2015 and is now in my twelfth year. The years go fast when you have fun! I have always had tasks related to acquisitions, but I have also once taken care of our lovely student assistants who we called library guards at the time. A fun task!

What are your main duties?
I’m part of the function Media, where I purchase literature for the Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare. I’m also responsible for interlibrary loans, which means everything from ensuring that both researchers and students get books and articles they can not find at the University Library, to invoicing and development of systems and routines. I’m also a member of the library’s communication team where I mainly work with social media but also other communication channels. Like most of the librarians, I also have scheduled time at the information desk a few times a week. Although the last six months I have spent most of my time as a working member in the project group for implementing a new library system, which has been both tough and frustrating but at the same time fun and educational!

What do you enjoy most about the job?
To help people, to help users get that article they need for their dissertation, or to make the students feel great when the leave the library after helping them a bit along the way. It’s also fun (and a challenge) to try and get information about the library to our users in a good way. In addition, having lovely colleagues makes life at work fun everyday.

What do you do when you’re not at work?
I’m a nerd that devour both movies, TV shows and I like to go to the cinema, theater, museum and I also read quite a lot of fiction as soon as I get a free time. I have a family who I spend a lot of time with and we often play boardgames together and as long as the kids are small, we like to be out geocaching or chasing Pokémons, but sometimes I force them to a cultural event instead.

Do you have any book tips you want to share?
I have a lot! but I’ll settle with three: Sara Lövestam’s books about the paperless private detective Kouplan provide insight into a whole different life than many of us live today, start with Sanning med modifikation (only available in Swedish). A dramatic and intense novel of my taste is Butcher’s Crossing by John Williams. It is about hunting buffalo but equally about the pursuit of your self. If you instead feel like having a funny reading experience, you have to read Christer Lundberg’s Bläckfisken (only available in Swedish). A tall tale that takes place in Gothenburg and in its madness gives many good laughs.

Text: Tandis Talay & Lena Holmberg
Foto: Tandis Talay

Hello Kristoffer Karlsson

In a series of portraits we are going to introduce the staff at the Library to all our readers and customers. Who are the people working at the library? And what are they doing there? Read our portraits and get to know your librarians! We asked Kristoffer a few questions.

What are your main duties?
I mainly work with publications in DiVA and support to researchers. In the future, I will work more with research data and help with information retrieval.

 What where you doing before you started working here?
After graduating from The Swedish School of Library and Information Science, I worked at Chalmers University of technology library in about one and a half year.
Do you have any book recommendations you want to share?
Norwegian Wood by Haruki Murakami are among the best books I’ve ever read. Everone should read it. The English translation, not the Swedish.
Another tip is The Expanse by James‘s A Corey. The first book is called Leviathan Wakes. It is now also available as a television series on SyFy. Best science fiction series since Battlestar Galactica and Firefly!
What made you apply to the library at the University of Borås?
I was homesick. I have been active in the University of Borås between 2009 and 2015 as a student and in the Student Union,I enjoyed it a lot. To get a job at the University Library was like coming home again. In addition, the work tasks seemed fun!
What are you most curious about within the Librarian role according to development?
I‘m very curious to see how the Librarian role will evolve now that we have the problem of alternative facts. Source criticism is more important than ever, and that’s something that librarians are professionals at. I want to see librarians taking place in the media and talk about source criticism and the importance of being skeptical.
Text & picture: Tandis Talay

Hi Alejandro (Alex) Crespo

In a series of portraits we are going to introduce the staff at the Library to all our readers and customers. Who are the people working at the library? And what are they doing there? Read our portraits and get to know your librarians! We asked Alex a few questions.

What are your main duties?
At present it is mostly about the implementation of our next library system and our new search engine that will replace the systems we use today. After the launch, I will mostly will be working with system management and usability testing of systems.

What did you do before you started working here?
I worked as Web/IT librarian at University West in Trollhättan.

What do you do when you’re not at work?
I try to go to concerts and try different restaurants.

Do you have any book recommendations you want to share?
If you are interested in use of tests and usability, you should read “Rocket Surgery made easy” and “Do not make me think” by Steve Krug. Anyone who is curious about information architecture should not miss ” How to make sense of any mess” by Abby Covert. It is also available as a website http://www.howtomakesenseofanymess.com/.

Last fiction book I read was “Mary” by Aris Fioretos. A book I can recommend.

What made you apply to the library at the University of Borås?
I want to work with something that has a clear link to user benefits. Availability of information is one of the library’s most important services. Systems should not constitute an obstacle for the communication of information and the creation of new knowledge. The ability to make these systems easier to use,  led me to seek the job.

Text and picture: Tandis Talay

Hello Karin Süld!

In a series of portraits we are going to introduce the staff at the Library to all our readers and customers. Who are the people working at the library? And what are they doing there? Read our portraits and get to know your librarians! We asked Karin a few questions:

What are your main duties in the Library Karin?

– I work with education in information seeking, source criticism and reference management, primarily for students at the Swedish School of Textiles. The teaching is organised so that each moment includes both a lecture and a workshop. The planning and evaluation of each moment is done in collaboration with the teachers of the various programs.

Another part of my work is to staff the library’s Information Point where students, staff and the general public can come to get help with small and big issues, ranging from finding at our premises to searching for information.

For how long have you worked here?

– I have worked here since the mid-90s, for a while, then! The work has changed a lot over the years. Among other things, education has increased and become an integrated part of the education. This has contributed to making the librarian role more of an educator than before. And, it’s impossible not to mention the digitisation, which has changed the work both in content and in approach.

What do you do when you’re not at work?

– Then I am with my family and my friends. I also like being out in the forest, fix in the garden, watching movies and reading. My husband and I are building a new house and moving to the country, so it will fill a lot of our spare time for a while.

Do you have any book recommendations you want to share?

– A book I would recommend is The detour by Gerbrand Bakker. It is a story about a woman who suddenly and without explanation, leaves her home in the Netherlands and settles in a house in the Welsh countryside. Her days seems to be mostly work in the garden and care of a number of geese who happens to be on the farm. There is much that is mysterious and odd in the story. A young man shows up, unclear why and who he is. The woman’s husband is looking for her along with a Dutch police. The US 1800-century poet Emily Dickinson figures, such as the woman who previously lived in the house. Gradually, however, the picture of the Dutch woman and her story becomes clearer. It is a quiet and at the same time exciting book with an unexpected ending.

What do you enjoy most about the job?

– To meet the students, take part of their work and their issues and together with them work the way through the information jungle. Collaboration with teachers is also very fun and interesting; it gives me a good insight into what is going on in the different courses at the Swedish School of Textiles.

Text: Karin Süld and Lena Wadell
Picure: Lena Wadell

Hi Christel Olsson!

In a series of portraits we are going to introduce the staff at the Library to all our readers and customers. Who are the people working at the library? And what are they doing there? Read our portraits and get to know your librarians! We asked Christel a few questions.

christel_books_1200

What are your main duties?
I work as a teaching librarian where I mainly teach the students who are studying to be teachers, preschool teachers and leisure-time pedagogues. I’ve worked here for quite a while so I have had the privilege to work with many different things over the years. The last few years have I worked in the function for Customer service but in March this year I started as a teaching librarian in the function for Education.

For how long have you worked here?
I’ve been working here since 2000. First I worked extra as a student assistant when I studied LIS and then (after 6 months at Jönköping University Library) I came here “for real” in 2002. Since then I have been on leave a few times, because of studies, parental leave or other jobs but I have always come back. Before I started here, I moved around and lived both abroad and in Sweden, I have studied and worked at a variety of places.

What do you do when you’re not at work?
I am happy to spend a lot of time with my children, either at the stable or in the icerink. They have caught an interest in my main hobby so now we ride together once a week and I try to practice their interest in figure skating by participating in an adult group, which is both scary and lots of fun. I love spending time with family and friends, I am part of a very cool book club and some other great “dinner-gatherings”.

We also visit our summer house in my hometown Kalmar as often as we can and once or twice a week I sell clothes through home sales. I also try to catch up with some jogging and skiing. I’m supposed to attend “TjejVasan” in the winter so I might have to increase my training volume a bit this fall. If time is given this semester I might also learn Icelandic once a week. I’m a little bit obsessed with Iceland.

What do you enjoy most about the job?
All interesting meetings and interesting conversations that take place here every day! Having the privilege of meeting all students. And then I have the absolute best, smartest and coolest colleagues so I think I can honestly say that I love going to work everyday.

Do you have any book tips that you want to share?
Jag heter inte Miriam by Majgull Axelsson – it feels more relevant than ever in view of the situation in the world right now. Then I would like to recommend Fyren mellan haven by M.L. Stedman. (The light between oceans) – it takes place in Australia, a country I often long for, and because I have never cried so much when reading a book.

Text: Christel Olsson and Lena Holmberg
Picture: Klaz Arvidson