The Phrasebank – get suggenstions on how to write

If you want inspiration when you’re writing an academic text, you could use a Phrasebank.

The University of Manchester has an Academic Phrasebank openly available on their webpage. The Phrasebank gives you tips on how to write academic texts, and examples of good phrases to use when you’re for example writing your Conclusion. The following suggestions are given for when you want to summarize your main research findings:

  • This study has identified …
  • This study has shown that …
  • The research has also shown that …
  • The second major finding was that …
  • These experiments confirmed that …
  • X made no significant difference to …
  • This study has found that generally …
  • The investigation of X has shown that …
  • The results of this investigation show that …
  • X, Y and Z emerged as reliable predictors of …
  • Multiple regression analysis revealed that the …
  • The most obvious finding to emerge from this study is that …
  • The relevance of X is clearly supported by the current findings.
  • One of the more significant findings to emerge from this study is that …

It is of course important to keep in mind that you can’t just pick any phrase from the examples and use it, the phrase has to match your text as well. The main objective when your writing your academic text is to get a consistent and well written text, and in order to get there you have to know what you are writing about. But the Phrasebank is a good help, it can give you inspiration when you’re stuck and don’t know how to continue.

You’ll find the Academic Phrasebank here.

Text: Katharina Nordling
Photo: Mostphotos

Essay tips – how do I write academic texts

Information searching just isn’t enough – in most cases the information has to be presented to others as well. Here you will find a variety of entrances to web pages, featuring tools to make what you have learned into well written papers and theses or splendid oral presentations.

Writing correct and spell correctly is one of the parts when writing scientific texts. Below are a few tips.

Lund’s University guide on academic writing is an excellent resource and open for all to use.

The Online Writing Lab (OWL) at Purdue University provides resources and instructional materials for academic writing.

The Language Lab offers professional guidance in Swedish, English and Swedish as a Second Language. The Language Lab can provide tools for improving your studies.

Google Translate helps you translate text from one language to another.

Text: Sara Hellberg, translated by Lisa Carlson

Academic texts, part 3: Scientific genres

In the previous post I wrote about blogs. In some circumstances blog posts can be regarded as scientific texts but in general blogs are not to be viewed as a scientific genre. To learn to identify specific genres may be helpful when determining which texts are scientific. A genre is distinguished by when texts assigned to the genre have some similarities (or regularities) e.g. contents, logical structure, typography, vocabularity and langugae. Some general scientific genres are:

  • Articles in scientific journals
  • Book/monographs
  • Chapter in an anthology
  • Doctoral/licentiate thesis
  • Conference paper
  • Review article/annual review

Some of these genres have been discussed in the previous blog posts. Reveiw articles are often littreature reviews. They summarizes the latest research in a specific area and try to draw conclusions from the results. The genres which are interesting for publishing differs between subject areas and countries. This is important to remember when looking at what is scientific text in different areas. Even the language used in the publication differs and has consequence whether research is mainly published nationally or internationally. It is also good to be aware that the English speaking authors do not have to make this decision – American researcher publishing in an American journal in English does not have to make a decision between national and interantional. To simplify some charecteristics in different areas:

  • Humanities
    • Monographs and book chapters are most common, often written in the national language
    • Articles are becomeing more common, even in international journals
    • Big differences between different subjects, e.g. linguists publish articles whereas researchers in litterature studies often publish monographs or book chapters
  • Natural Sciences, technology and medicine (STM)
    • Articles published in English in international scientific journals
    • Conference papers are particularly prestigious in some subject areas (e.g IT)
  • Social Sciences
    • Artciles published in English in international scientific journals
    • Books in the national language
    • Big differences between different subjects

Referenser: Hellqvist, B. (2010). Referencing in the humanities and its implications for citation analysisJournal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, 61(2), 310-318. //Helena Francke, lector at BHS Blog posts are translated from Swedish by Pieta Eklund.

Academic texts, part 7: internet sources

To have a special blog post about scientific texts on Internet might seem a bit old fashioned. Most of the examples I have used before are from the web, either from scientific journals, conference proceedings, books freely available online or resources which you as students at the university can access. The university library subscribes to e-journals and e-books. A number of the scientific texts we come in contact with are available online but there are some special web resources which I would like to touch upon, especially those when the researchers themselves make their research freely available online.

During the last 15 years Open Access movement has grown bigger. The movement aims to make as many research publications as possible freely (without any cost for the reader) available online. Open access has been quite successful when it comes to articles, confrernce proceedings, doctoral/licentiate thesis and student thesis and more and more of books are made freely available (e.g. Libraries, black metal and corporate finance).One way to make articles open access is to publish them in an open access journal which does not charge the reader. Examples of this are PLOS Biology och Human IT, which has been mentioned in the previous blog posts. To publish open access does not indicate anything about the scientific quality of the research. The research quality can be extremly high or less so.

Another way to open access is that the text is published in a subscribtion based journal, printed in an anthology or similar but the author makes the text available in some other way. In these cases it should be clear where the text has been published originally and therefore you know it has gone through peer review. In some cases the auhtor makes a text available which has not been accepted for publishing. This is called pre-print. In these cases no one has peer reviewed the text to determine the reliability of the text.

When an author makes a published text available it is often done in one of the following ways:

  • In an open archive/repository. An archive like this might be provided by the researchers’ university, e.g. University of Borås’ BADA, or it can be subject oriented, e.g. arXiv.org which has become very popular in physics, computer science, mathematics and related research areas.
  • On the researcher’s own web site. This option might be a bit less used nowadays due to the institutional archives. In this case the researcher makes his/her research available through a web site, e.g. James Paul Gee,a researcher who has written a lot about learning, computer games and socio-cultural theory. You might notice that Gee is using a blog platform to make his research available. Just because it is a blog does not say anything about the scientificness or reliability of his texts. You should look at other indicators such as who is behind the published text and other aspects discussed in the previous blog posts.

Finally, I would like to point out that not all publications and all journals which say they are scientific are that. You have probably noticed that. All kinds of publications get distributed online which makes it easy to encounter journals which are not as scientific as they say they are (e.g. Open access and predatory publishers.) Tips given in these blog posts give a first indication on what you should look for to make an informed decision whether a text is scientific or nor. The more scientific and non-scientific texts your encounter the easier it will be to judge what is what.

And ask for help! You can discuss these matters with

  • your course mates
  • your teachers
  • Librarians

//Helena Francke, lector at BHS

Blog post is translated from Swedish by Pieta Eklund.

Academic texts, part 6: Contents and form

The research’s scientific attitude and how the researchers have reached the results should be made visibile by the contents of the academic text. The author/authors should be very clear which perspective is set on the text and be critical of other’s texts and even one’s own analysis. It is important for the reader to udnerstand what the researcher has done and how it is done no matter what kind of research it is. What kind of ground is there to draw the conclusions? Which interpretations and analysis are made? Transparancy is important when it comes to the ground the research lays on and the methods used. There are of course scientific texts which in one way or another challenges this, either consciously or uncounsciously.

Within many research areas it is important to express yourself clearly, precisely and to use the vocabulary which is standard in the area.

Many articles in scientific journals, conference papers and in some cases even book chapters describe an (more or less experimental) empirical study which is then  interpretated and put in context with other studies. A classic structure for such a text within e.g. Sciences or some Social Sciences is from IMRD-model:

  • Introduction (problem formulation, aim, research questions, previous research, theory)
  • Method (description of method(s) and possible ethical considerations)
  • Results (account for results and analysed results)
  • Discussions (connecting results to previous research and theory, conlusions and possible suggestions for future research)

What actually is written differs from research area to research area – it might be method, theory or to discuss the analysis in connection to previous research. The above is also a model used in doctoral dissertations and in monographs when presenting a larger empirical study (or part studies). One alternative is that each chapter shows an example of a theme which is then discussed in the concluding chapter although a lot of the analyis is written in the chapters through out the book.

Doctoral dissertations are often formed as so called complation thesis (article thesis, thesis by publication). This means that the thesis contains of a number of scientific articles published in scientific journals or conference publications. The articles are  preceded by an introductory or summary chapters where the author has the possibility to discuss the research questions, methods and theory, write a short summary of the articles and then relate them to the research questions and each other and also the draw some conclusions from the results of all of the articles.

Of course there are many ways to structure scientific articles. Scientific publiations may include more that just text, e.g. video, image and diagrams. Try to understand what is normal and usual, and also try to identify what is allowed within your area or studies by using examples that you find.

//Helena Francke, lector at BHS

Blog posts are translated from Swedish by Pieta Eklund.

Academic texts, part 5: Target Audience

Sometimes you can determine whether a text is scientific och popular scientifc by getting a sence of who is the primary target audience of the text. Scientific texts are written the other researchers in the subject area in mind. This means that some things are taken for granted, e.g. subject knowledge or that the author is familiar with a specific theoretic tradition. It might also mean that a specific language (e.g. established terms or mathematical formulas) is used which is not easy to understand for those outside of the research area. Consequenses for readability differs between the research areas – in some subjects the target audiences ia a wide audience, even the generel public, while in other areas texts are mainly written for specialists. These specialists may include both researchers and professional population.

Within the natural sciences and history there are many good examples of writing popular science articles and presenting research in a more accessible way. Journals whose main audience (as authors and/or reader) is professional people are often (not always) popular science, branch or trade journals.

Scientific journals are aimed for researchers, students and professional people.The following for example is written in the description of description of Journal of Documentation from Emerald Publishers:

”Key journal audiences

  • Educators, scholars, researchers and advanced students in the information sciences
  • Reflective practitioners in the information professions
  • Policy makers and funders in information-related areas
  • The Journal’s content will also be of value to scholars and students in many related subject areas.”

In Author guidelines for the influential journal Nature we can see that the journals is written a number of audiences in mind but that all of them are not expected to read each and every article:

”Authors are strongly encouraged to attempt two 100-word summaries, one to encapsulate the significance of the work for readers of Nature (mainly scientists or those in scientifically related professions); and the other to explain the conclusions at an understandable level for the general public.” (From “For Authors”)

Both of these journals have researchers, students and professional people within the special areas as the target audience but they are also open for the fact that even general public might be interested in the articles.

//Helena Francke, lector at BHS

Blog posts are translated from Swedish by Pieta Eklund.

Academic texts, part 3: Scientific genres

In the previous post I wrote about blogs. In some circumstances blog posts can be regarded as scientific texts but in general blogs are not to be viewed as a scientific genre. To learn to identify specific genres may be helpful when determining which texts are scientific.

A genre is distinguished by when texts assigned to the genre have some similarities (or regularities) e.g. contents, logical structure, typography, vocabularity and langugae. Some general scientific genres are:

  • Articles in scientific journals
  • Book/monographs
  • Chapter in an anthology
  • Doctoral/licentiate thesis
  • Conference paper
  • Review article/annual review

Some of these genres have been discussed in the previous blog posts. Reveiw articles are often littreature reviews. They summarizes the latest research in a specific area and try to draw conclusions from the results.

The genres which are interesting for publishing differs between subject areas and countries. This is important to remember when looking at what is scientific text in different areas. Even the language used in the publication differs and has consequence whether research is mainly published nationally or internationally. It is also good to be aware that the English speaking authors do not have to make this decision – American researcher publishing in an American journal in English does not have to make a decision between national and interantional.

To simplify some charecteristics in different areas:

  • Humanities
    • Monographs and book chapters are most common, often written in the national language
    • Articles are becomeing more common, even in international journals
    • Big differences between different subjects, e.g. linguists publish articles whereas researchers in litterature studies often publish monographs or book chapters
  • Natural Sciences, technology and medicine (STM)
    • Articles published in English in international scientific journals
    • Conference papers are particularly prestigious in some subject areas (e.g IT)
  • Social Sciences
    • Artciles published in English in international scientific journals
    • Books in the national language
    • Big differences between different subjects

Referenser:

Hellqvist, B. (2010). Referencing in the humanities and its implications for citation analysis. Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, 61(2), 310-318.

//Helena Francke, lector at BHS

Blog posts are translated from Swedish by Pieta Eklund.