Teaching information seaching

Teachers, now it’s time to book information searching for your students for the next semester. If you know that it is (or should) be a part of the course you are responsible or involved in, then please contact one of our teaching libraries. We have already booked a lot of teaching and it is getting crowded in our schedules.

We who work as teaching librarians are from the left: Lena Wadell, responsible for the business and economic programs and Informatics. Sara Hellberg is in charge of the Care and Health  programs. Karin Süld handles textile programs like fashion design and textile technology. Birgitta Rutberg is in charge of Engineering such as building, resource recovery, chemistry and industrial economics and the library and information science. Åsa Brolund is new here at the Library and is responsible for all teacher programs.

Photo: Klaz Arvidsson
Text: Lena Wadell

Hello Åsa Brolund!

In a series of portraits we are going to introduce the staff at the Library to all our readers and customers – who are the people working at the library? And what are they doing there? Read our portraits and get to know your librarians! Here you got to know Åsa, new librarian, a little bit. 

Åsa, what did you do before you started to work here?

I have mostly worked in high school libraries and enjoyed it. Learning and information seeking in combination, helping and guiding in the learning situations is so rewarding!

What are your main duties?

I will be teaching information literacy to students mainly in pedagogy, so I will guide future preschool teachers, teachers, as well as educational professionals teachers and immigrant academy. In addition to teaching, I work at the information point.

What made you apply to the library at the University of Borås?

To be involved in and develop the student’s information skills in various ways, within the framework of the library, attracted me! The university is multifaceted and so does library activity, to suit all programs.

What do you do when you’re not at work?

When I do not work, I devote myself to my family and the animals at home on the farm. It’s a challenge too, haha.

What are you most curious about within the Librarian role according to development?

One thing that interested me since I studied library and information science here in Borås, is the conversation that takes place at the information desk, or in learning situations when a question is asked for a librarian and what kind of answers follow and how the question and the questionnaire become treated. How do you do the best in these situations as a librarian? A close interest in me is also how we best educate in information literacy.

 Do you have any book tips you want to share?

Att tro på Mister Pip by Lloyd Jones -about the book and the power of fantasy in a war-torn environment where the written word is barely accessible.

Jonathan bortom all kontroll by Meg Rosoff – smart and somewhat screwed novel about relationships and applicants.

Det finns ingenting att vara rädd för by Johan Heltne – a novel about faith, shame and sickness, adult and love …

Text: Åsa Brolund & Lena Wadell
Photo: Lena Wadell

Information seaching on the schedule

Do you know what some librarians do in the library besides being available in the information points? If you are studying a program, there is always a schedule where there is information search in the library or Information Literacy. Many of the students who have been to the workshops have gained one and another Eye-opener

In the library we are these five librarians who educate students in information literacy. From the left: Birgitta Karin Sara Christel and Lena.

We plan the occasions together with the teachers for all program students, and the education takes place in three stages. We often have both lecture and workshop so the “tools” to seek their information can be used directly. What is meant by information literacy or information searching? Well, it’s all about finding out right in the library, searching efficiently online, and in databases, how to see different types of articles for source criticism and reference writing.

Among the students who came at the scheduled times, responding to our evaluations, we have received the comments:

“Very good with both theory and practice, many useful search terms and methods for finding information faster and more efficiently”

“Nice to know where to look !! “Now I can search much better”

“Awesome! got many useful tips! and great work afterwards “Looking for more ways and getting better on searching” “superfun!”

“Did me motivate to start searching for articles!”

“Very good and useful information, clearly presented!”

“The exercise was relevant and the questions made me reflect and want me to develop”.

“Relevant databases, I learned how to find topics”

“Reference writing is top notch! Can save a lot of time. Then it is absolutely important to define and combine keywords to help you find what you’re looking for ”

“How to use the subject headings! I did not have a clue before! ”

Here you can read another blog post about the information literacy education:

http://biblioteksbloggen.hb.se/2016/10/19/information-search-more-important-than-you-think/?lang=en

Text & Picure: Lena Wadell

Hi Lena Holmberg!

In a series of portraits we are going to introduce the staff at the Library to all our readers and customers. Who are the people working at the library? And what are they doing there? Read our portraits and get to know your librarians! We asked Lena a few questions.

How long have you been working here?
I celebrated ten years as an employee in 2015 and is now in my twelfth year. The years go fast when you have fun! I have always had tasks related to acquisitions, but I have also once taken care of our lovely student assistants who we called library guards at the time. A fun task!

What are your main duties?
I’m part of the function Media, where I purchase literature for the Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare. I’m also responsible for interlibrary loans, which means everything from ensuring that both researchers and students get books and articles they can not find at the University Library, to invoicing and development of systems and routines. I’m also a member of the library’s communication team where I mainly work with social media but also other communication channels. Like most of the librarians, I also have scheduled time at the information desk a few times a week. Although the last six months I have spent most of my time as a working member in the project group for implementing a new library system, which has been both tough and frustrating but at the same time fun and educational!

What do you enjoy most about the job?
To help people, to help users get that article they need for their dissertation, or to make the students feel great when the leave the library after helping them a bit along the way. It’s also fun (and a challenge) to try and get information about the library to our users in a good way. In addition, having lovely colleagues makes life at work fun everyday.

What do you do when you’re not at work?
I’m a nerd that devour both movies, TV shows and I like to go to the cinema, theater, museum and I also read quite a lot of fiction as soon as I get a free time. I have a family who I spend a lot of time with and we often play boardgames together and as long as the kids are small, we like to be out geocaching or chasing Pokémons, but sometimes I force them to a cultural event instead.

Do you have any book tips you want to share?
I have a lot! but I’ll settle with three: Sara Lövestam’s books about the paperless private detective Kouplan provide insight into a whole different life than many of us live today, start with Sanning med modifikation (only available in Swedish). A dramatic and intense novel of my taste is Butcher’s Crossing by John Williams. It is about hunting buffalo but equally about the pursuit of your self. If you instead feel like having a funny reading experience, you have to read Christer Lundberg’s Bläckfisken (only available in Swedish). A tall tale that takes place in Gothenburg and in its madness gives many good laughs.

Text: Tandis Talay & Lena Holmberg
Foto: Tandis Talay

Hello Karin Süld!

In a series of portraits we are going to introduce the staff at the Library to all our readers and customers. Who are the people working at the library? And what are they doing there? Read our portraits and get to know your librarians! We asked Karin a few questions:

What are your main duties in the Library Karin?

– I work with education in information seeking, source criticism and reference management, primarily for students at the Swedish School of Textiles. The teaching is organised so that each moment includes both a lecture and a workshop. The planning and evaluation of each moment is done in collaboration with the teachers of the various programs.

Another part of my work is to staff the library’s Information Point where students, staff and the general public can come to get help with small and big issues, ranging from finding at our premises to searching for information.

For how long have you worked here?

– I have worked here since the mid-90s, for a while, then! The work has changed a lot over the years. Among other things, education has increased and become an integrated part of the education. This has contributed to making the librarian role more of an educator than before. And, it’s impossible not to mention the digitisation, which has changed the work both in content and in approach.

What do you do when you’re not at work?

– Then I am with my family and my friends. I also like being out in the forest, fix in the garden, watching movies and reading. My husband and I are building a new house and moving to the country, so it will fill a lot of our spare time for a while.

Do you have any book recommendations you want to share?

– A book I would recommend is The detour by Gerbrand Bakker. It is a story about a woman who suddenly and without explanation, leaves her home in the Netherlands and settles in a house in the Welsh countryside. Her days seems to be mostly work in the garden and care of a number of geese who happens to be on the farm. There is much that is mysterious and odd in the story. A young man shows up, unclear why and who he is. The woman’s husband is looking for her along with a Dutch police. The US 1800-century poet Emily Dickinson figures, such as the woman who previously lived in the house. Gradually, however, the picture of the Dutch woman and her story becomes clearer. It is a quiet and at the same time exciting book with an unexpected ending.

What do you enjoy most about the job?

– To meet the students, take part of their work and their issues and together with them work the way through the information jungle. Collaboration with teachers is also very fun and interesting; it gives me a good insight into what is going on in the different courses at the Swedish School of Textiles.

Text: Karin Süld and Lena Wadell
Picure: Lena Wadell