Information seaching on the schedule

Do you know what some librarians do in the library besides being available in the information points? If you are studying a program, there is always a schedule where there is information search in the library or Information Literacy. Many of the students who have been to the workshops have gained one and another Eye-opener

In the library we are these five librarians who educate students in information literacy. From the left: Birgitta Karin Sara Christel and Lena.

We plan the occasions together with the teachers for all program students, and the education takes place in three stages. We often have both lecture and workshop so the “tools” to seek their information can be used directly. What is meant by information literacy or information searching? Well, it’s all about finding out right in the library, searching efficiently online, and in databases, how to see different types of articles for source criticism and reference writing.

Among the students who came at the scheduled times, responding to our evaluations, we have received the comments:

“Very good with both theory and practice, many useful search terms and methods for finding information faster and more efficiently”

“Nice to know where to look !! “Now I can search much better”

“Awesome! got many useful tips! and great work afterwards “Looking for more ways and getting better on searching” “superfun!”

“Did me motivate to start searching for articles!”

“Very good and useful information, clearly presented!”

“The exercise was relevant and the questions made me reflect and want me to develop”.

“Relevant databases, I learned how to find topics”

“Reference writing is top notch! Can save a lot of time. Then it is absolutely important to define and combine keywords to help you find what you’re looking for ”

“How to use the subject headings! I did not have a clue before! ”

Here you can read another blog post about the information literacy education:

http://biblioteksbloggen.hb.se/2016/10/19/information-search-more-important-than-you-think/?lang=en

Text & Picure: Lena Wadell

Hi Lena Holmberg!

In a series of portraits we are going to introduce the staff at the Library to all our readers and customers. Who are the people working at the library? And what are they doing there? Read our portraits and get to know your librarians! We asked Lena a few questions.

How long have you been working here?
I celebrated ten years as an employee in 2015 and is now in my twelfth year. The years go fast when you have fun! I have always had tasks related to acquisitions, but I have also once taken care of our lovely student assistants who we called library guards at the time. A fun task!

What are your main duties?
I’m part of the function Media, where I purchase literature for the Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare. I’m also responsible for interlibrary loans, which means everything from ensuring that both researchers and students get books and articles they can not find at the University Library, to invoicing and development of systems and routines. I’m also a member of the library’s communication team where I mainly work with social media but also other communication channels. Like most of the librarians, I also have scheduled time at the information desk a few times a week. Although the last six months I have spent most of my time as a working member in the project group for implementing a new library system, which has been both tough and frustrating but at the same time fun and educational!

What do you enjoy most about the job?
To help people, to help users get that article they need for their dissertation, or to make the students feel great when the leave the library after helping them a bit along the way. It’s also fun (and a challenge) to try and get information about the library to our users in a good way. In addition, having lovely colleagues makes life at work fun everyday.

What do you do when you’re not at work?
I’m a nerd that devour both movies, TV shows and I like to go to the cinema, theater, museum and I also read quite a lot of fiction as soon as I get a free time. I have a family who I spend a lot of time with and we often play boardgames together and as long as the kids are small, we like to be out geocaching or chasing Pokémons, but sometimes I force them to a cultural event instead.

Do you have any book tips you want to share?
I have a lot! but I’ll settle with three: Sara Lövestam’s books about the paperless private detective Kouplan provide insight into a whole different life than many of us live today, start with Sanning med modifikation (only available in Swedish). A dramatic and intense novel of my taste is Butcher’s Crossing by John Williams. It is about hunting buffalo but equally about the pursuit of your self. If you instead feel like having a funny reading experience, you have to read Christer Lundberg’s Bläckfisken (only available in Swedish). A tall tale that takes place in Gothenburg and in its madness gives many good laughs.

Text: Tandis Talay & Lena Holmberg
Foto: Tandis Talay

Hi Alejandro (Alex) Crespo

In a series of portraits we are going to introduce the staff at the Library to all our readers and customers. Who are the people working at the library? And what are they doing there? Read our portraits and get to know your librarians! We asked Alex a few questions.

What are your main duties?
At present it is mostly about the implementation of our next library system and our new search engine that will replace the systems we use today. After the launch, I will mostly will be working with system management and usability testing of systems.

What did you do before you started working here?
I worked as Web/IT librarian at University West in Trollhättan.

What do you do when you’re not at work?
I try to go to concerts and try different restaurants.

Do you have any book recommendations you want to share?
If you are interested in use of tests and usability, you should read “Rocket Surgery made easy” and “Do not make me think” by Steve Krug. Anyone who is curious about information architecture should not miss ” How to make sense of any mess” by Abby Covert. It is also available as a website http://www.howtomakesenseofanymess.com/.

Last fiction book I read was “Mary” by Aris Fioretos. A book I can recommend.

What made you apply to the library at the University of Borås?
I want to work with something that has a clear link to user benefits. Availability of information is one of the library’s most important services. Systems should not constitute an obstacle for the communication of information and the creation of new knowledge. The ability to make these systems easier to use,  led me to seek the job.

Text and picture: Tandis Talay

Hello Karin Süld!

In a series of portraits we are going to introduce the staff at the Library to all our readers and customers. Who are the people working at the library? And what are they doing there? Read our portraits and get to know your librarians! We asked Karin a few questions:

What are your main duties in the Library Karin?

– I work with education in information seeking, source criticism and reference management, primarily for students at the Swedish School of Textiles. The teaching is organised so that each moment includes both a lecture and a workshop. The planning and evaluation of each moment is done in collaboration with the teachers of the various programs.

Another part of my work is to staff the library’s Information Point where students, staff and the general public can come to get help with small and big issues, ranging from finding at our premises to searching for information.

For how long have you worked here?

– I have worked here since the mid-90s, for a while, then! The work has changed a lot over the years. Among other things, education has increased and become an integrated part of the education. This has contributed to making the librarian role more of an educator than before. And, it’s impossible not to mention the digitisation, which has changed the work both in content and in approach.

What do you do when you’re not at work?

– Then I am with my family and my friends. I also like being out in the forest, fix in the garden, watching movies and reading. My husband and I are building a new house and moving to the country, so it will fill a lot of our spare time for a while.

Do you have any book recommendations you want to share?

– A book I would recommend is The detour by Gerbrand Bakker. It is a story about a woman who suddenly and without explanation, leaves her home in the Netherlands and settles in a house in the Welsh countryside. Her days seems to be mostly work in the garden and care of a number of geese who happens to be on the farm. There is much that is mysterious and odd in the story. A young man shows up, unclear why and who he is. The woman’s husband is looking for her along with a Dutch police. The US 1800-century poet Emily Dickinson figures, such as the woman who previously lived in the house. Gradually, however, the picture of the Dutch woman and her story becomes clearer. It is a quiet and at the same time exciting book with an unexpected ending.

What do you enjoy most about the job?

– To meet the students, take part of their work and their issues and together with them work the way through the information jungle. Collaboration with teachers is also very fun and interesting; it gives me a good insight into what is going on in the different courses at the Swedish School of Textiles.

Text: Karin Süld and Lena Wadell
Picure: Lena Wadell

Hi Kajsa Magnusson!

In a series of portraits we are going to introduce the staff at the Library to all our readers and customers. Who are the people working at the library? And what are they doing there? Read our portraits and get to know your librarians! We asked Kajsa a few questions:kajsa

How long have you worked here?
I first worked here as a student assistant for two years while reading my second and third year at the The Swedish School of Library and Information Science. Now I’ve got a temporary job at the library and have just started. I have just finished my third week and there is a lot to take in.

What will be your main duties?
I will be part of the unit, customer services and my task is to ensure that everything in the library premises works. Printers, computers, copiers, etc. as well as furnishing and functionality. I will also ensure that current information is displayed on our monitors and other places. The handling of invoices on overdue books is another task. I will also show the library for new staff at the University and any external groups. In short, I will have an overview of all of the study environment, it is my job to ensure that everything flows. I will also be seen often at the library information desks and that is something I am previously used to. I am also included in the library’s communication team where I work with information displayed through social media.

What do you enjoy most about the job?
The most fun is to help people and to ensure that they have access to everything they need. It is especially fun to show what resources we have and get our users to understand how to use everything and to show them how amazing it is with librares!

What do you do when you’re not at work?
I really like being outdoors in nature. I love excursions and to discover new things. I also have an allotment in Gothenburg where I spend a lot of time. I also like to do textile handicraft, right now there’s a lot of knitting and sewing going on.

Do you have any book tips you want to share?
A book I would recommend is Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse. The story is about an Indian boy who grows up in a wealthy family. But he is a seeker and embarks on a journey where he lives in various ways to try to find his own way. It is a philosophical history. This summer I worked at Gothenburg City Library, where I started to read a lot of children and young adult books. Right now I am reading the Circle by Mats Strandberg and Sara Bergmark Elfgren.

Text: Lena Holmberg
Picture: Katharina Nordling

Hi Magnus Pettersson!

 

In a series of portraits we are going to introduce the staff at the Library closer to all our readers and customers. Who are the people working at the library anyway? And what are they doing there? Read our portraits and get to know your librarians! In our second portraint you’ll meet Magnus Pettersson who recently started working at the Library:

Whamgpet were you doing before you started here?

Before my employment here began I worked at the Education Library at the University of Gothenburg. I cataloged books and e-journals, and I also did some development projects, for example a way to showcase our e-books in the book hall. Before that, I worked at the Library at Karolinska institutet, doing almost the same as I did in Gothenburg. I have also worked at several other different academic libraries in Sweden, Härnösand and Jönköping for example.

What made you apply for a job at the University of Borås?

The vacancy that was advertised sounded very exciting. I liked the fact I would be able to meet the Library’s customers at the Information point and still have time to work with the different systems the Library use. It’s a good combination, I think; when I continually get input from the meetings with the borrowers I can change the systems for the better.

What are your main duties?

Right now I’m working mainly on two different projects; I create a web page that will handle e-books borrowed from one of our e-book vendors and I’m also working on developing a book display for our web page.

What do you like most about being a librarian?

There’s a lot! But one reason that I like being a librarian is that I’ve always liked to figure things out, to find things, and that’s something you spend a lot of time doing when you’re a librarian. You’re looking for answers and in your search for that answer you use a lot of different methods and along the way you find different clues.

Do you have any book tips that you want to share?

The last book I read was surprisingly good actually – it was World War Z by Max Brooks. Otherwise, my all-time favorite is One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich by the Nobel Prize winner Aleksandr Isaevič Solzenicyn, a book I read several times by now.

Text & picture: Katharina Nordling

Hi Thomas Nyström!

In a series of portraits we are going to introduce the staff at the Library closer to all our readers and customers. Who are the people working at the library anyway? And what are they doing there? Read our portraits and get to know your librarians! First up: Thomas Nyström, who started at the Library January 7th 2015. Here he answering five questions:
thnyWhat were you doing before you started here?
I come from the Library at the Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm, where among other things I was working with teaching of the course Information Retrieval och Source Criticism and Literature Studies. Working with education is very much about evaluating and developing what is being taught. How can the course structure and tasks make the students participate actively and work toward the learning outcomes? How can we improve the course structure, activities, and materials? In teaching I tried to achieve unity and create alignment between different parts of the course.

In addition to teaching I also worked with the Library’s website. Both in terms of editorial news updates and to improve the Web’s structure and navigation.

I manned the library’s circulation desk and Search Lab, it was mainly students who came to them but also some PhD students and researchers.

What are you doing here at the Library?
I work primarily with support for researchers, it may be performing search task for researchers and research; or to find and present citation data. Those are two tasks I worked with since I came here. I will also be working with communication. An example would be the blog Research Related where I will write about things that may be helpful to think about when you are publishing an article, for example which databases that index the journal a researcher wants to publish in. I will also be working with the University’s new digital archive DiVA and provide information on self-archiving and publishing in Open Access.

What is the biggest challenge of your new job?
Hmm, understanding the organization; and to develop support for researchers. These two things go together, I have to get to know the organization in order to see what is good and then strive to make it even better. What kind of support do we offer today? Can we scale it up? How do we inform about this support?

What do I do in your spare time?
The past few days I have moved. In conjunction with the move, I decided to buy and build a new computer. I also read a very good book which I found hard to put down. Now I’ve read the book and built the computer. The next step is to paint the apartment…

Do you have any book tips that you want to share?
Alastair Reynolds “Revelation Space” (the book I read now during the move) and Vernor Vinge “A Deepness in the Sky”.

Thank you Thomas, and welcome to the Library!