Academic ceremony and scientific publications

Friday 4th of May the University is celebrating the annual Academic ceremony – a ceremony where research is at the center when new professors are inaugurated and a doctoral degree conferment ceremony is held. A fundamental part of research is the scientific publications, the texts in which the research is described and communicated to the world in general and research colleagues in particular.

For the PhD students who, with their dissertation, completed their postgraduate studies and thus can be said to be finished researchers, it is the doctoral thesis that is the great crown of their work. It is the publication with great P, the goal that is sought throughout the entire postgraduate program. Doctoral theses may differ from each other, but there are two main forms – compilation thesis or monograph thesis.

In the compilation thesis, there are a number of previously published scientific articles that are combined into a whole by writing an introductory to the thesis. A monograph thesis is instead a single coherent text – much like a regular book. However, both types of theses have in common that the content must be so new or revolutionary that it could be presented in international research context.

Once you have a doctoral degree you can start your career as a researcher. Now there is no longer the obvious goal, the doctoral thesis that has to be completed. However, you still need to publish. Now, the researcher is constantly working to publish reports on the research being done, whether the research is done in joint research project or solely on his/hers chamber.

How this is done, and what different types of publications are used, depends to a large extent on the subject area the researcher is active in. There is a difference between how a researcher in chemistry and a researcher in sociology publishes. In science, medicine and nursing, for example, the scientific article is the focus, while in the humanities it is much more common for research results to be presented in books or reports.

At the university, all research published must be registered in the university’s publishing database DiVA. There you can find the research published by the people who are in focus at this year’s academic ceremony, but also research published by all other PhD students, doctors, lecturers and professors at the university. If there is any special research you are interested in, but you cannot the find full text, you are always welcome to the library and we will help you locate the text.

Text & Photo: Katharina Nordling

Published at the University of Borås in 2016

Every year researchers, teachers and other staff at the University of Borås publish a variety of publications, most of which presents research results or similar. The publications come in a range of different types; doctoral theses, licentiate theses, peer review articles, popular scientific articles, book chapters, books, reports, etc. All of these publications are to be registered in the university publication database DiVA. This means that if you are interested in what is published by the university – search DiVA to find out.

In 2016, more than 470 publications were registered in DiVA, and there still might be some publications which haven’t yet been registered, so the final number of publications for 2016 is still unclear.

However, we know that in 2016 eight doctoral and two licentiate theses were published at the university, as it was ten research students who defended their theses during the year. All these dissertations, and a variety of other publications published by employees at the university in 2016, are now on display in our glass cabinets at the entrance to the library. Come and have a look!

Text & picture: Katharina Nordling

 

Peerage of Science

A couple of weeks ago BioMed Central wrote in one of their blogs that they are now accepting manuscripts which have gone through a peer review by Peerage of Science community. I think this is very interesting because this initiative makes the research world and peer review process more open and transparent compared to the traditional peer review process. This means also that journals do not have to put as much of their energy into finding reviewers which might lead to faster publishing process.

Peerage of Science was started about a year ago Peerage-of-Science1 by a couple of Finnish researcher. With this initiative the review process in itself becomes more important. You are able to build your research career and reputation by giving high quality reviews. You have the possibility to review rather than weed out all requests to review from journals. The idea with the service is simple: create a group of peers who all have signed up for making the review process more transparent.

As a researcher you may send a manuscript to Peerage of Science without being a member but you may become a member. There are two ways for this: either you already have a track record of published articles or your manuscript receives favorable reviews.

Read also BMC series blog on how Peerage of Science works.

Text: Pieta Eklund