Help with your references

You can use automatic features of the various search engines to get the information to be included in the bibliography.

Summon – www.hb.se / library
The library’s multi-search discovery tool. Here you will find references to our printed books and lots of e-books and articles.

Libris – libris.kb.se
Sweden’s national library catalog. Here you can find books, dissertations, reports, and so forth, available at Swedish libraries.

Google Scholar – scholar.google.se 
Here you can do a broad search for scientific literature. You also can find student papers, theses, books, abstracts and articles, from universities and academic publishers here. Note, however, that everything in Google Scholar is not “scientific” but there are still different in content and functions other than the search engine Google.

Completing required
Please note that the appearance and content can vary between different search engines – therefore, always make sure that all references in your source list has a consistent look and follows the style you’ve chosen to use. Especially Swedish article references are sometimes inaccurate and needs to be adjusted. Below two examples from the Harvard style:

Reference to the book:
Eklund, K. (2007). Our economy: An introduction to the national economy. 11. Edition, Stockholm: Norstedt academic publishers.

The reference to article:
Elmqvist, C., Brown, D., Fridlund, B., & Ekebergh, M. (2010). Being first on the scene of an accident – experiences of ‘doing’ prehospital emergency care. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, 24 (2), ss. 266-273.COLOURBOX7313844

Other databases and search engines
The subject-specific databases that the library subscribes to also have these features.Contact the library if you have any questions regarding any individual database!

Text: Sara Hellberg

Updated: 2014-10-03 Lisa Carlson

Find scientific articles

We notice in the library’s information points that you students are searching for scientific articles in quite extensively right now. Therefore, we highlight a blog post from last fall on how to go about finding scientific articles in Summon. Enjoy!

Have you been instructed to seek a scientific article and read it, present it, and critically assess it? Have you then had difficulty finding one? You might even think about what a scientific article is. We have written in the blog a few times before, what scientific publishing is as well as source criticism. Scientific articles are short articles that report described the results of scientific studies. It is the communication channel between researchers. The Library has numerous scientific journals containing scientific articles and you must use database search to find them.

First you need to think about what subject you want to find a scientific article about. It does not matter if it is, for example in health care, education, information science, law, or the development of technologies to extract energy from old jeans, you can still start with Summon, one of the library’s search tool.

You should first think about which search terms that may be of interest, therefore, the concept describes the topic you want to find articles within, and start your search with those terms. You can not start your search by searching for “scientific article” for then you will get hits on “how to write a scientific article”, which may not be what you want.

Also note that most of the Librarys available material is in english, which is the communicate language of scientific results, which means that you usually have to do your search in english.

vet_artikel_eng

To the left of the results list is something that librarians call facet. These are ways for you to narrow your search. In the picture to the right you will see some options. If you check in “Peer-review” to get hits on articles from scientific publications which means that the material published are examined and found to achieve an academic level. Obviously you still need to do a review of the article, since there are different types of articles, even in journals that are considered to contain scientifically reviewed material. If you select “Scientific Publications“, it means that you limit to material published in peer-reviewed publications but also materials that target audiences in the scientific / academic context. Therefore, the “peer-review publications” is preferable if you are just looking for a scientific article. In the content type, you can choose to limit you to the type of publication eg books / e-book, journal article, patent, etc. There are more facets to choose from and they can further narrow your search.

Text & Picture: Pieta Eklund och Lisa Carlson

 

Search engines will help you fix the references

You can use automatic features of the various search engines to get the information to be included in the bibliography.

Summonwww.hb.se / library
The library’s multi-search discovery tool. Here you will find references to our printed books and lots of e-books and articles.

Librislibris.kb.se
Sweden’s national library catalog. Here you can find books, dissertations, reports, and so forth, available at Swedish libraries.

Google Scholar scholar.google.se
Here you can do a broad search for scientific literature. You also can find student papers, theses, books, abstracts and articles, from universities and academic publishers here. Note, however, that everything in Google Scholar is not “scientific” but there are still different in content and functions other than the search engine Google.

Completing required
Please note that the appearance and content can vary between different search engines – therefore, always make sure that all references in your source list has a consistent look and follows Harvard Guide. Especially Swedish article references are sometimes inaccurate and needs to be adjusted.

Reference to the book:
Eklund, K. (2007). Our economy: An introduction to the national economy. 11. Edition, Stockholm: Norstedt academic publishers.

The reference to article:
Elmqvist, C., Brown, D., Fridlund, B., & Ekebergh, M. (2010). Being first on the scene of an accident – experiences of ‘doing’ prehospital emergency care. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, 24 (2), ss. 266-273.COLOURBOX7313844

Other databases and search engines
The subject-specific databases that the library subscribes to also have these features.Contact the library if you have any questions regarding any individual database!

Text: Sara Hellberg

 

Endnote news

EndNote is the reference management program that the University of Borås provide for their students and researchers. The program simplifies your reference management and can help you manage your bibliographic references and create the right type of reference for you. Most databases and our library discovery system Summon supports an export of references to EndNote. It’s then easy to connect Endnote to Word so that you can export references into your working document and create a proper reading list. Be sure to select the correct format for your references, the most common are Harvard and APA, and you will find information and guides to both on the library website. But be sure to read the instructions of your particular teacher and institution for which referencesystem that should be used.

We’ve made two short guides, they are in swedish but it’s easy to follow them just by looking at the instructions. How to export from Summon to Endnote and How to export from Google Scholar to Endnote. Otherwise you are welcome to the informationdesk, and we will show you how to make it work.

A novelty is that Endnote is soon updated to Endnote X6, then a sync function between desktop Endnote and WebEndnote will work, this was not previously possible. There is also an app for iPad that can be downloaded from iTunes, which also can sync to your Endnote account. But importantly, this applies only when the X6 version is in place, which will take a couple of weeks yet, and we will have to return to it.

Text & film: Lisa Carlson

The nobelprizes 2012 and our collection

In the University Library in Borås, you can find articles in Summon by all this year’s prizewinners in:

Physics:  Serge Haroche  and David J. Wineland

Chemistry: Robert J. Lefkowitz and Brian K. Kobilka

Fysiology or Medicine: Shinya Yamanaka and John B. Gurdon

Economics: Alvin E. Roth and Lloyd S. Shapley

The articles featured here are all available in full text. You may need to identify yourself with your log on credentials to get access to the articles. Please contact the library if you are having trouble.

You can also search for free articles by the scientist in Wiley Online Library (this is just one place to look for free materials). Just search for the author and then identify the ones that are freely avaible with this symbol:

free_wiley

Or take a look at this page from ScienceDirect, they’ve listed their articles with free access of this years nobelprize winners.

There are also a lot of youtube lectures and other materials about the prizewinners.

For example a physics tv-show with David J. Wineland titled Physics for the 21st Century: David Wineland: The Quantum World Single Ion Clocks.

Two lectures by Robert J. Lefkowitz titeled Seven Transmembrane Receptors and  Beta arrestines.

A lecture by Shinya Yamanaka from 2011.

Alvin E. Roths lecture with the title What Have We Learned from Market Design

There are also interviews like this one with John B. Gurdon.

You can read a lot more on the official Nobelprize website.

Text: Lisa Carlson