Information seaching on the schedule

Do you know what some librarians do in the library besides being available in the information points? If you are studying a program, there is always a schedule where there is information search in the library or Information Literacy. Many of the students who have been to the workshops have gained one and another Eye-opener

In the library we are these five librarians who educate students in information literacy. From the left: Birgitta Karin Sara Christel and Lena.

We plan the occasions together with the teachers for all program students, and the education takes place in three stages. We often have both lecture and workshop so the “tools” to seek their information can be used directly. What is meant by information literacy or information searching? Well, it’s all about finding out right in the library, searching efficiently online, and in databases, how to see different types of articles for source criticism and reference writing.

Among the students who came at the scheduled times, responding to our evaluations, we have received the comments:

“Very good with both theory and practice, many useful search terms and methods for finding information faster and more efficiently”

“Nice to know where to look !! “Now I can search much better”

“Awesome! got many useful tips! and great work afterwards “Looking for more ways and getting better on searching” “superfun!”

“Did me motivate to start searching for articles!”

“Very good and useful information, clearly presented!”

“The exercise was relevant and the questions made me reflect and want me to develop”.

“Relevant databases, I learned how to find topics”

“Reference writing is top notch! Can save a lot of time. Then it is absolutely important to define and combine keywords to help you find what you’re looking for ”

“How to use the subject headings! I did not have a clue before! ”

Here you can read another blog post about the information literacy education:

http://biblioteksbloggen.hb.se/2016/10/19/information-search-more-important-than-you-think/?lang=en

Text & Picure: Lena Wadell

Hello Katharina Nordling!

In a series of portraits we are going to introduce the staff at the Library to all our readers and customers. Who are the people working at the library? And what are they doing there? Read our portraits and get to know your librarians! We asked Katharina a few questions.

porträtt_KAK_bloggenWhat are your main duties?
A large part of my time is devoted to communication. I lead the team at the Library working with communication. To be more concrete we’re talking about planning and writing blog posts like this one, writing news for our web site and maintaining our feeds in social media. We also have a newsletter for employees at the university that needs planning and writing before we send it away. Besides communication, I also work a little bit with some of our systems (especially our system for maintaining loans) and research support.

What made you apply for a job at the University of Borås?
I was a student at the university when I applied for a job here, and the thought of working at the university library was quite attracting for a student at the School of Library and Information Science. I mean this was the library where I had gone looking for books and articles so many times; just the thought of working here was thrilling. Plus it was such a nice library, just a few years old! Besides, I was at that time fairly clear that I wanted to work at a university, college or business library. The reason to this was partly the kind of people using these kinds of library, but also that I had a feeling that the technological development was faster within these libraries. And since I also have training as a computer engineer, I was drawn to it. If it is true that technological development is faster at these types of libraries or not, I leave unsaid today.

Today, I would gladly recommend others to apply for a job at “my” library. In my eyes, this is still a very good library, with the small organization’s advantage when it comes to speed and agility. It’s easy to change things, and your voice is listened to and taken into account. Plus it works a bunch of incredibly skilled (and funny) people here. Who doesn’t want that kind of colleagues?

Did you know from the start that you wanted to work with the things you do today?
Not at all! And I’ve worked with quite different tasks since I started here almost 10 (!) years ago. Purchase, teaching, programming, research support, web and communication. I think this is fun, there is the opportunity to try different things and develop in different directions. And if this question is rather about whether I’ve always wanted to be a librarian, the answer is still no. I became a librarian by coincidence, but it was still lucky, because it is a really fun job.

What do you enjoy most about the job?
I don’t know if it is possible to say that “this is the most fun,” but one thing that I appreciate very much my job is to try to work out how we can best inform our users about our business. So concretely it’s to reflect on how we will get our users to understand the extent of what we can do for them. And that applies both to students, researchers and other staff. And then it’s also very fun to meet users that already has realized that we can help them, and actually help them in a good and professional manner. For example, it is a very nice feeling when you helped a student to manage a database and the student receives articles that make sense from their perspective, and you see that the student really understands. In moments like that, it’s very fun to work.

Do you have any book tips that you want to share?
Jennifer Government by Max Barry is worth reading. It’s a twisted, funny and terrifying vision of the near future, when the world is run by giant corporations and employees take the last names of the companies they work for. It’s a globalised, ultra-capitalist free market paradise! It gives you something to think about.

Text: Katharina Nordling & Lena Holmberg
Photo: Lena Holmberg

The retirement of an experienced librarian

Today is an end of an era at the library – one of our most experienced librarians is retiring.

Librarian Elisabeth Andersen has been working at the University of Borås since 1977. The main task for Elisabeth during these years has been the library catalog. Cataloging and classifying books is Elisabeth’s area of expertise, and she is a true expert at what she does.

AvtackningThroughout her years at the library Elisabeth has experienced a lot of change and development within the library field. When she first started working here the catalog was a printed card catalog and the classification system used was called SAB (a Swedish classification system used mainly in Sweden and some Swedish speaking areas in Finland). Today our catalog is managed by computers and we have a new classification system called Dewey (a system libraries use all over the world). Elisabeth has been a central person in both of these changes.

Porträtt av Elisabeth Andersen.

Elisabeth Andersen.

During the ceremony today where we all celebrated Elisabeth’s retirement she told us that she was around six years old when she first knew she wanted to be a librarian. After studies at Uppsala University and The Swedish School of Library and Information Science her dream came true. She started her career as a librarian here at the University of Borås library, and now 37 years later she is retiring.

 

 

 

Text: Katharina Nordling
Picture: Klaz Arvidson & old picture from the archive